Master of Science 

Akamai University

Dr. David Ackah & Dr. Gabriel Odeh Apotey

Institute of Project Management Professionals

Approved; 03 May 2017

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The demand for project managers is increasingly vital to many areas of business today as a result of organizations embarking on complex projects with the view to creating unique products and services. Projects specification, scope statement and profiling require expert knowledge in cost, time, and quality management. The Bachelor Degree Program is structured to train students to apply contemporary project management principles, tools, and concepts to mitigate and manage challenges associated with modern project execution.

 

The effective management of an organization’s project impact on the achievement of its goals. This goal is sometimes lost if the organization lacks key management personnel trained to manage the complexity of projects. The program seeks to provide students with opportunity to enhance their skills as project managers dealing with project planning and control, project implementation and management, and managing any risks associated with projects. Students will be able to use tools and methods efficiently and effectively, and introduce the most suitable technology to ensure success of their future projects.

 

Regards,

 

Dr. David Ackah, PhD. FPMP – Program Director, Project Management Programs

Dr. Gabriel Odeh Apotey, PhD. CPMC – Deputy Director and Program Coordinator

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This program is conducted onsite in Ghana and is open only to those students able to physically attend the residential sessions. As prerequisites for acceptance to the Master of Science in Project Management, participants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized Bachelor’s degree in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful and increasingly responsible experience in the field of project management, project finance, project engineering, project procurement engineering and industry. The Bachelor’s degree requirement is never waived. However, on occasion, well qualified applicants are accepted to the Master of Science lacking elements of preparation. Under these conditions, participants are required to add the missing competencies at the onset of their program, at their own expense. Participants should be proficient in collegiate English language skills, have access to a computer, email, and the Internet, and business journals and library resources to support their study and research.  

 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Students in the Master of Science in Project Management complete a minimum of 40 credits above the Bachelor’s level. The coursework requirements include core academic studies, a major concentration, a research preparation class, a comprehensive examination, research proposal, and a business research project and an oral review of research.

 

Participants in the Master of Science complete the following required program elements:

 

Master of Science Degree Requirements (Required: 40 credits)  

 

Core Academic Studies (18 credits) 

Major Concentration in Business Administration (9 credits) 

Research Preparation (3 credits) 

Comprehensive Review (2 credits) 

Thesis Proposal (2 credits) 

Thesis Project (4 credits) 

Oral Review of Thesis (2 credits) 

 

Core Academic Studies (Required: 18 credits) 

These course modules are the foundational competencies in theories, principles, and practices, and the historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the discipline. These courses represent the essential elements, which define your field of Project Management and establish the underlying foundations upon which participants base their advanced professional development. Core coursework examines the details of project management, lean management, project procurement engineering, organizational behavior, human resource management, strategic management, financial management, and logistics and supply chain management and includes a mandated Business Practicum in the student’s major concentration.  NOTE: Appropriate alternative core studies may be negotiated by the student with the Program Director.  

Participants complete core foundational studies, as outlined below:

 

Year 1 Semester 1

PMP 501: Advance Quantitative Methods (2 credits)

PMP 503: Managerial Economics (3 credits)

PMP 505: Total Quality Management (2 credits)

PMP 507: Operations Research (2 credits)

 

Year 1 Semester 2

PMP 502: Engineering Project Management (3 credits)
PMP 504: Project Portfolio Management (2 credits)
PMP 506: Practical Project Management (2 credits)
PMP 508: Project Planning & Administration (2 credits)

Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits) 

Requirements for this part of the program include completion of five modules in a specialization in business administration, including a business practicum and four modules exploring a project management concentration in one of the following areas of concentration in Project Management:

 

  • Project Management Engineering
  • Project Procurement Engineering
  • Project Logistics Management
  • Project Financial Engineering
  • Applied Project Financial Economics

 

Project Management Engineering (9 credits minimum)

PMP 577: Business Practicum (2 credits)

PMP 551: Modern Project Management (2 credits)

PMP 553: Program Management Leadership (1 credit)

PMP 555: Reconstructing Project Management (2 credits)
PMP 557: Project Estimation & Cost Management (2 credits)

 

Project Procurement Engineering (9 credits minimum)

PMP 577: Business Practicum (2 credits)

PMP 543: Lean Management (1 credit)

PMP 545: Sourcing, Negotiating and Contracting (2 credits)

PMP 547: Country Procurement System (2 credits)

PMP 541: International Public Procurement -IPP (2 credits)

 

Project Logistics Management (9 credits minimum)

PMP 577: Business Practicum (2 credits)

PMP 531: Service Operation Management (2 credits)

PMP 533: Technology in Reverse Logistics Operations (2 credits)

PMP 535: Inventory & Materials Management (1 credit)

PMP 537: Distribution & Warehouse Management (2 credits)

 

Project Financial Engineering (9 credits minimum)

PMP 577: Business Practicum (2 credits)

PMP 524: International Monetary & Financial Theory (2 credits)

PMP 526: Portfolio Design and Investment Analysis (2 credits)

PMP 528: Applications & Extensions of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (2 credits)

PMP 522: Applied Financial Engineering (1 credit)

 

Applied Project Financial Economics (9 credits minimum)

PMP 577: Business Practicum (2 credits)

PMP 513: Economics of Sustainable Development (2 credits)

PMP 515: Financial Fiscal Policy & Economic Development (2 credits)

PMP 517: Macroeconomic Theory in Financial Management (1 credit)

PMP 511: Financial Econometric (2 credits)

Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits)

MSc participants pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their business projects. At least three credits of research preparation are required, although for particular students, more than one module will be recommended to assure effective readiness to undertake the favored business project proposed by the student.  

 

Preparation might focus upon Project management area research, quantitative-statistical methods, qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques. The focus of the research preparation covers subject selection, project design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each participant’s final project. Through this requirement, participants learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study, implementing quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating business issues.  

 

Required: A minimum of three credits selected from one of the following modules: 

 

RES 520: Business Research (3 credits) 

RES 504: Introductory Research Statistics (3 credits) 

RES 506: Advanced Research Statistics (3 credits) 

RES 508: Qualitative Research (3 credits) 

RES 510: Participatory Action Research (3 credits) 

 

Comprehensive Review (Required: 2 credits) 

Once the participants complete the subject modules, they are requested to schedule the Comprehensive Review. The Review Committee shall provide directions for the written component of the review. When the Committee has reviewed the participant’s written submission, an exchange of communications is conducted to assist the Committee in exploring the details of the written submission.

 

Required: Complete the following module:

 

EXM 880: Comprehensive Review (2 credits)  

 

Business Project Proposal (Required: 2 credits) 

Participants prepare a formal proposal related to the concept for the business project following the guidelines provided by the Review Committee and the University.  

 

Required: Complete the following module:

 

RES 885: Business Project Proposal (2 credits)  

 

Business Project

Following approval of the MSc project management area project proposal, participants begin their projects. The business project may be conducted via an established mode of business research or by quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research methods. The body of the manuscript is to be structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines and exceed 50 double spaced, typewritten pages. Participants complete a project that adheres to field their major concentration.  

 

Required: Complete the following module:

 

RES 890: Business Project (4 credits)  

 

Oral Review of Business Project (Required: 2 credits) 

Once the participants have prepared the business project manuscript, they schedule the formal review process. The Review Committee will conduct the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and prepare for the oral review. The physical review of the manuscript usually takes the Review Committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to the underlying review of the literature, the project methodology, the mechanics of the project, the body of the manuscript, and the presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations. The oral review of the project is carried out by approved electronic means and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the project report. The Review Committee will explore issues related to the project including methodology, review of literature, presentation, and interpretation of the findings. One outcome of the review process is Master of Science a set of final expectations directing the participant through the remaining tasks for completing the project manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the participant will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship one bound manuscript to University headquarters for permanent archival storage  

 

Required: Complete the following module:

 

EXM 895: Oral Review of Business Project (2 credits)  

 

PROGRAM FACULTY  

Dr. David Ackah, PhD. Program Director, Project Management Engineering

Dr. Gabriel Odeh Apotey, PhD. Deputy Director (Program Coordinator), Project Financial Engineering

Dr. Samuel Amoako, PhD. Applied Project Financial Engineering

Cosmos Ekyinaba MSc. Project Logistics Management

Makafui R. A. Ackah, MSc, MCIPS. Project Procurement Engineering

Dr. Samuel Afotey Annang, PhD. Program Registrar

 

PROCESS OF PROGRAM COMPLETION  

 Step #1: Assignment of Faculty Review Committee 

After the participant’s admission and registration, as the first step in the program, the University will assign the participant’s Graduate Review Committee, including a Chair and one supportive faculty member. Once the Committee Chair has been assigned, the participant shall begin the preliminary activities of the degree program.  

 

Step #2: Study Plan Process 

The first activity of the program is the completion of the Study Plan document, which guides the participant and review committee through the degree process. The Study Plan clarifies the specialization that will be pursued, itemizes the Master of Business Administration subject modules, and clarifies the project activities to be completed as expectations for the degree, and includes a timeline for completion of activities.  

 

Step #3: Core Foundational Subjects 

Participants enter the core subject phase of their program, completing six modules.  

 

Step #4: Major Concentration

Participants continue the subject module phase of their program, completing three modules in a selected area of focus including the business practicum.  

 

Step #5: Research Preparation Module 

All participants shall complete at least one three-credit research preparation module related to the type of project they plan to undertake. Research preparation is carried out under Akamai University instruction and coordination. As the primary outcome of this activity, participants produce a brief paper that focuses upon the background and problem statement for the business project and methods to be used to undertake their project.  

 

Step #6: Comprehensive Review 

After completion of the research preparation module, participants complete the Comprehensive Review. The primary assignment for this activity is the preparation of an effective Summary of the findings from the modules with clear reflection upon the theme of the thesis. The Review Committee shall present instructions for completion of the assignment in written format to the participant. Upon review of the participant’s written submission, the Review Committee shall conduct an exchange of email dialogue helping the participant perfect the summary. Participants MUST back-up the paper to CD or another media, as this is a required submission.  

 

Step #7: Business Project Proposal 

Participants submit the thesis proposal under the direction of the assigned member of the Akamai faculty. After making the required changes and additions, the proposal is approved. Students MUST back-up the proposal to CD or another media, as this is a required submission.  

 

Step #8: Business Project

Participants shall complete the Thesis Project guided by the approved Thesis Proposal. Referencing of the business literature throughout the manuscript is a vital element of the manuscript, without which it shall not receive University approval. Participants MUST back-up the draft project report to CD or another media, as this is a required submission.  

 

Step #9: Oral Review of Thesis

The Review Committee is provided a draft version of the thesis manuscript for physical review. The Committee prepares a listing of concerns and questions to be explored with the participant during the oral review of thesis. Participants are Master of Business Administration expected to be able to explore the thesis in detail. The oral component of the review of thesis should be recorded, video or audio. A written version of the Committee’s questions and concerns, as well as a brief set of notes from the oral review is provided to the universities for permanent archival record. This is a required submission.  

 

Step #10: Final Activities 

Following the review of business project, the Review Committee shall provide the participant with instructions for completing final corrections and modifications to the business report manuscript. Following approval of the final manuscript, the participant then arranges for binding the manuscript, and the document is submitted to both universities, with any remaining quality control materials. The student completion is then acknowledged by both universities.  

 

COURSE MODULE DESCRIPTIONS  

 

Core Academic Studies  

 

PMP 501 Advance Quantitative Methods 2 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth to both basic and advanced analytical tools for business disciplines. Beginning with simple statistical methods, the course builds to more robust analytical techniques such as multivariate linear regression. Emphasis is placed on theoretical understanding of concepts as well as the application of key methodologies used by industry. This course also aims to promote a critical perspective on the use of statistical and econometric information. Topics includes: Collection of Data, Presentation of Numerical Information, Descriptive Statistics for Frequency Distribution, Correlation & Regression, Time Series Introduction to Quantitative Techniques, Linear Programming (Graphical Method), Linear Programming (Simplex Method), Linear Programming (Transportation Method), Forecasting, Decision Analysis.

 

PMP 502: Engineering Project Management (3 credits)

This course encompasses the key elements of operations management and investment analysis and pulls them together in a coherent format that allows you to understand the ‘big picture’ as well as ‘the specific details’. It is aimed at integrating the knowledge gained from the different engineering subjects you have studied into a framework and process that allows you to implement your solutions and ideas in a commercial environment. Engineers have traditionally played an important role in management, largely because design and technology were the main key factors for success in product and process design, but also the fact that our engineering degree gave us outstanding analytical skills to solve a multitude of problems.  Topics includes: Project & Project Management, Value Management, Project Appraisal & Risk Management, Project Management & Quality, Environmental Management, Project Financing, Cost Estimation in Projects & Contract, Project Control using Earned Value Control, Project Stakeholders, Contracts Strategies & Contract Selection Process, Contract Policy & Documentation, Project Organization Design and Structure, Design Management, Supply Chain Management, Team-Base Supply Chain & Partnership, Private Finance Initiate & Public-Private Partnership, Aspect of implementing of industrial Project, Project Management in Developing Countries, The future of Engineering Project Management, 

 

PMP 503: Managerial Economics (3 credits)

This course focuses upon the application of economic models and rationale choice to business decision making. Managerial Economics is the application of economic theory and methodology to managerial decision making problems within various organizational settings such as a firm or a government agency.  The emphasis in this course will be on demand analysis and estimation, production and cost analysis under different market conditions, forecasting and decision making under uncertainty. Students taking this course are expected to have had some exposure to economics and be comfortable with basic algebra. Some knowledge of calculus would also be helpful although not necessary. Topics includes: the fundamentals of managerial economics, Demand and Supply, Regression Analysis: Demand Estimation, Costs of Production and the Organization of the Firm, Market Structures: Pricing and Output Decisions, Game Theory and Pricing Strategies, The Economics of Information and the Role of Government in the Marketplace, Regulating the Market Economy, and Project Decisions

 

PMP 504: Project Portfolio Management (2 credits)

This course specifically addresses how organizations achieve strategic goals and objectives through Project Portfolio and Programs of multiple Projects and how participants can gain competence in managing these. Specifically, this unit will address how an organization strategically applies systematic problem solving techniques, and selects, initiates, prioritizes, executes and controls initiatives through Portfolio Alignment, Monitoring and Control. The course will also consider how an organization can benefit from delivering multiple projects in a Program environment including governing, controlling and supporting the organization’s strategy through Program Management. The course objective is to build competence in managing portfolios and programs. Topic includes: Organizational context, problem definition, problem solving skills, the portfolio prioritization process, select an organization and a challenge, program context, program management processes, explain the 11 program management processes, select an organization program

 

PMP 505: Total Quality Management (2 credits)

Total Quality Management (TQM) is a scientific approach for management and employees to be involved in the continuous improvement of processes underlying the production of goods and services. This approach is fundamental in business, industry, evidence-based medicine and many other disciplines. Candidates who complete this course will be able to critically appraise management techniques, choose appropriate statistical techniques for improving processes and write reports to management describing processes and recommending ways to improve them. People need to be aware of what they can and can’t do with data. Management is limited to what it knows and so too is the organization. Awareness of statistical techniques and their use is paramount to collecting information and making decisions. Quantitative skills are necessary in order to make decisions – else you are just another person with an opinion. Topics includes the Deming Quality philosophy (and that of other Quality theorists), understanding variability of processes through statistical thinking, the role of management and leadership in a TQM organization, the role of quality improvement teams and how to organize them, the “seven simple tools”; data collection through surveys and experimental design; basic statistical methods; more advanced statistical techniques such as control charts, statistical process control and experimental design; quality standards (ISO9000); complementary quality techniques such as benchmarking

 

PMP 506: Practical Project Management (2 credits)

The management processes used in the past to enable the delivery of new products and services are no longer effective. The need to deliver new and unique products and services (projects) usually arises from organization strategy and business plans. Therefore, to achieve superior delivery performance, the management approach must build on organization strategy, integrate with business imperatives, and focus on the objectives (the projects). Traditional project management tended to focus primarily on the processes of managing projects to successful completion. To manage projects from their inception through to actual delivery of the business-enabling objectives, a different project management approach is needed. Project management needs to become part of the business and, in order to achieve that, organizations need to come to terms with the business of project management.  Topics includes: projects and project management, the context of project management, projects and strategic linkages, the wrappers model, implementing business focused project management, introduction to ODPM, the project initiation phase, the project definition phase, the project planning phase, the project execution phase, the project close-out phase.

 

Modules in the Project Management Concentrations

 

PMP 507: Operations Research (2 credits)

Operations Research studies analysis and planning of complex systems. This course will focus on mathematical modelling. A strong emphasis will be given to model formulation. On the methodology side, Linear and Integer Programming techniques will be introduced. At the end of the course, students will have the skills to build their own formulations, to expand existing formulations, to critically evaluate the impact of model assumptions and to choose an appropriate solution technique for a given formulation. Topics include: Optimization with a nonlinear objective function, Advance techniques in none nonlinear programming, Introduction to stochastic programming models, Probabilistic dynamic programming models, Probabilities dynamic inventory models, Waiting line models, Computer simulation of management systems.


 

PMP 508: Project Planning & Administration (2 credits)

The key to economic and social growth in all countries-developed or developing-is better management in all sectors: agriculture, industry, public works, education, public health, government. In the USA. in recent years, investigators have studied waste and mismanagement on a wide range of construction projects, including nuclear power plants, in the federal government itself, and in numerous other situations.1,2,3 Remedial actions are being attempted in both education and practice. There is a growing awareness of the need to improve both the productivity and quality of projects. For example, in 1969 a report by the American Society for Engineering Education (A SEE) indicated only 10 bachelor’s level programs in engineering management. Yet, according to the Engineers Joint Council, two-thirds of all engineers are likely to spend the last two thirds of their careers as managers.s With schools of engineering becoming more aware of the need to include management in the curriculum, the number offering engineering management programs had risen by 1979 to 25.6 In 1979 Kocaoglu surveyed the status of graduate programs in engineering management and found 70 with some offered jointly with a school of business. Topics includes: Introduction to the Integrated Project Planning and Management Cycle (IPPMC), the IPPMC and Case Materials, Feasibility Analysis and Appraisal of Projects, Project Evaluation, Guidelines for Writing IPPMC Case Histories, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Hawaii Bagasse Pellets Project, The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, Lessons Learned from Selected IPPMC Case Histories.

 

PMP 511: Financial Econometric (2 credits)

The Elements of Econometrics is a year course for the 3rd level students. This is an introductory Econometrics course for the students specialized in Economics. Statistics course is a pre-requisite, as well as Economics and Mathematics courses. The course is taught in English and finally examined by the University of London international programme.  The stress in the course is done on the essence of statements, methods and approaches of econometric analysis. The conclusions and proofs of basic formulas and models are given which allows to the students to understand the principles of econometric theory development. The main accent is done on economic interpretations and applications of considered econometric models. The course is mostly oriented at cross-sections econometrics; some topics of time series and panel data econometrics are also taught in the course. The course covers introduction to Econometrics, Simple Linear Regression Model (SLR) with Non-stochastic Explanatory Variables. OLS estimation, Multiple Linear Regression Model (MLR): two explanatory variables and k explanatory variables, Variables Transformations in Regression Analysis, Dummy Variables, Linear Regression Model Specification, Heteroscedasticity, Stochastic Explanatory Variables. Measurement Errors, Simultaneous Equations Models, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, Binary Choice Models, Limited Dependent Variable Models, Modelling with Time Series Data. Dynamic Processes Models, Auto correlated disturbance term, Time Series Econometrics: Nonstationary Time Series, Panel Data Models.

 

PMP 513: Economics of Sustainable Development  (2 credits)

This course examines the socio-economic sources of resistance to the application of new technologies in addressing sustainability challenges. An understanding of what technology is and how it evolves forms the introduction to the course.  It explores the relationships between contemporary innovation and ecological disruptions. While new technologies are seen by some as important drivers of economic productivity and sustainability, others point to the potential risks that such technologies pose to human health and the environment. This course aims to go beyond many of the health and environmental claims and examine the underlying socio-economic sources of technological controversies. However, the same techniques have the potential to contribute to ecological management. The course examines the political economy implications of new technological applications for sustainable development, drawing from specific case studies. It covers the following themes: (1) theoretical and historical aspects of technology and sustainability; (2) resistance to green technologies; and (3) the role of innovation policy in fostering the sustainability challenge. The core text for the class is The Nature of Technology: What it is and How it Evolves by W. Brian Arthur. The Nature of Technology is the most authoritative outline of the nature, origin and evolution of technologies currently available. Class discussions will draw from Professor Juma’s draft book, Innovation and Its Enemies: Resistance to New Technologies. The course covers origins and evolution of technology:  Introduction, What is technology? Origins of technologies, Co-evolution of technology and economy. Disruptive Manufacturing, Technologies: The Case of 3D Printing, Coffee and Tractors [Topic memo due], Margarine and Recorded Music, Electricity and refrigeration, Technology and institutions, Technological lockin. International diffusion of agricultural biotechnology. Resistance to green technologies: Pest-resistant transgenic crops, Transgenic fish [Extended outline due], Wind energy, transgenic trees. Disruption Policy and institutional implications: Precautionary principle, Biosafety, public controversy and the media, from market niches to techno-economic paradigms, Science and technology advice, Science and technology diplomacy

 

PMP 515: Financial Fiscal Policy and Economic Development (1 credit)

The purpose of this course is seeks to introduce the student to the causes of the development of state intervention in the economy (and the philosophy that accompanies it) and it focuses on the analysis of the differences in the economic policy applied over the recent period. The course examines policy options, with their strategic trade-offs and operational implications, for the design and implementation of public finance in both high-income countries as well as developing and transitional economies. The course will cover the following topics: the role and size of the public sector, including the rationale for public sector interventions such as market failure and distributional concerns; key factors determining a nation’s fiscal architecture; public resource mobilization via user charges and taxation, including the economics of taxation, taxation of income (personal and corporate income tax), wealth (property tax), and consumption (sales, excise, and value added taxes), tax incentives, tax compliance and enforcement, and tax reform; public expenditure policy, including assessment of government social protection programs, megaprojects, public sector efficiency and effectiveness, and the role of the private sector in the production and provision of public goods and services; fiscal balance and deficit financing; and fiscal decentralization and intergovernmental fiscal relations. The course will also explore public finance challenges for both national and subnational governments in coping with the impact of the recent global economic crisis. The course utilizes case studies, placed in a comparative conceptual framework, to evaluate the impact of alternative resource mobilization and expenditure policies on allocative efficiency, social equity, and economic growth. More specifically, the syllabus comprises: The basic Macroeconomic Concepts, The market economy (Achievements and weaknesses. Optimal allocation of productive resources. Welfare criteria), The State and the concept of interventionism, Public Expenditure: classification criteria, Public goods (cost of public goods, methods of financing), Revenue: classification, Tax policy (types of taxes, tax policy measures, tax burden), Public debt (Forms-categorization, Objectives), Budgeting, Influences of government intervention in the economy (Taxes and Macroeconomic Effects. Duties and Microeconomic Effects, Multipliers), Fiscal policy (the stabilization measures of the economy. Fiscal and monetary policy)

 

PMP 517: Macroeconomic Theory in Financial Management (2 credits)

Students examine how the economy behaves at the aggregate level and how national income is measured and determined. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; measuring gross domestic product, inflation, and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, long-term growth; money, banking and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power and interest rate parity. Financial Management introduction, Financial Ratio Analysis, Financial Forecasting Improve the Planning and Performance, Working Capital, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Required Rate of Return on an Investment, Evaluate Investment Choices, Applications in Capital Budgeting

 

PMP 524: International Monetary & Financial Theory (2 credits)

This course examines the basic theories and concepts of international finance and open economy macroeconomics. Topics include: foreign exchange market, exchange rate determination, balance of payments, interest and exchange rate arbitrage, speculation and hedging. Macroeconomic policy under fixed and flexible exchange rates in an open economy will also be discussed. Additionally, the international debt problem, foreign direct investment will also be discussed. Review of open economy macroeconomics, Detailed algebraic treatment of the derivation of Circular Flow of Income, Multiplier, Accelerator Review of Balance of Payments, The current account, Capital Account, Official financing and Reserves, The Markets for Currencies, Arbitrage, Hedging, Speculation, Interest parity, Foreign Exchange Markets, Exchange Rate regimes, International Financial Markets, Types of financial markets, Financial Commodities traded, Exchange Rate Determination, Fixed, Floating, Managed Float, Macroeconomic Policy with Fixed Exchange Rates, Macroeconomic Policy with Flexible Exchange Rates, Aggregate demand and supply in the Open Economy, Inflation, Interest Rates and Exchange Rates, Macroeconomics of development, The International Debt Crisis

 

PMP 526: Portfolio Design and Investment Analysis (2 credits)

This course provides a comprehensive coverage of basic concepts, theories, applications and decision-making rules in financial investments. In particular, the course will focus on the analysis of stocks, bonds, options and other derivative securities. Additionally, the course will examine the role and performance of portfolio managers, mutual funds and other investment companies. This course is organized into two distinct halves. The first half of the course examines investment analysis from the standpoint of the individual. Topics covered in the first half include investment alternatives, security markets, trading procedures, bond valuation, stock valuation, and market indices. The second half of the course examines investment portfolio formation, management and evaluation. Other topics examined in the second half include efficient markets, portfolio theory, capital market theory, portfolio performance evaluation, and the use of derivative securities. The course cover basics of financial investments: how securities are traded, how securities are issued, and implications of efficient capital markets. Portfolio theory: diversification and asset allocation, the Markowitz portfolio selection model, analysis of equity: valuation of equity, financial statement analysis. Portfolio management: mutual funds, hedge funds, and other investment companies, passive and active portfolio management, portfolio performance evaluation. Analysis of fixed income securities: bond prices and yields, bond duration and convexity, managing bond portfolios. Analysis of derivative securities: option strategies, option valuation using binomial option pricing and black-scholes, forwards, futures, and swaps, hedging using derivatives

 

PMP 528: Applications & Extensions of the Capital Asset Pricing Model 1 Credits

The course covers contemporaneous issues in investments and builds on knowledge acquired in Finance. This is a graduate course geared towards students who will conduct research in the form of dissertation or thesis. The course is designed to give students exposure to a wide variety of research in the area of empirical asset pricing. The course is based on seminars in which the students present assigned papers. Asset Pricing Intelligence; What is Finance? Introduction to Capital Markets; The Two period Model: Consumption, Production, Capital Markets, Investments; Separation, The Two period Mode, Time value of money analytics, mappings; Historical, Returns, Security Indices; Expected Utility Theory, Historical Returns, Expected Utility, Theory, Security Indices; Stochastic, Dominance, Expected Utility; Stochastic Dominance; Mean Variance Portfolio Theory; Simple Construction; Pricing Models, Asset Pricing and Anomalies, Empirical regularities, Behavioural Finance, Short-selling, Hedge Fund Trading Session, Professional Investors, Market Microstructure, Dynamics of expected returns, Bond market liquidity risk, Linear Beta Pricing; CAPM, APT; Linear, Beta pricing with Inefficient Benchmarks, State Preference Theory; The Term

Structure of Interest Rates, Term Structure The Term Structure of Interest Rates; Informational Efficiency; Portfolio, Performance; Agency and Information of Interest Rates; Informational Efficiency; Portfolio, Performance; Agency and Information.

 

PMP 531: Service Operation Management (2 credits)

This course is an introduction to the concepts, principles, problems, and practices of successful service operations management. Emphasis is focused on preparing students to identify and apply appropriate management processes to ensure efficient, effective, and quality oriented service operations, while achieving operational excellence. Topics covered include: the role of services in the economy, strategic positioning and internet strategies, environmental strategies, new service development process, managing service expectations, front-office & back-office interface, service quality, yield management, waiting time management, and site selection. Topics includes: The Role of Services in an Economy, The Nature of Services, developing a vision of the business, building customer loyalty, Using Information Systems to Better Serve the Customer, the service delivery system, achieving breakthrough service, structuring the service enterprise, managing service operations, managing the service profit chain, competing on service quality, achieving total customer satisfaction, managing growth and renewal

 

PMP 533: Technology in Reverse Logistics Operations (2 credits)

This course studies the use of GPS, RFID and bar coding technology used to track and trace products through the forward supply chain and the reverse logistics process. The student will study the complex issues of data synchronization facing today’s reverse logistics manager. This course will provide the learner required knowledge in technology. This knowledge will range from basic information systems to planning of networks, architectures, and databases. The learner will then move into ethics, security, and project management. Finally, the learner will wrap up the course with a firm grasp of supply chain and globalization in the technology realm of logistics. Instruction is primarily textbook driven with case studies, essays, forum topics and a research paper. Logistics Management is the part of supply chain management that plans, implements, and controls the efficient, effective forward and reverse flow and storage of goods, services, and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption in order to meet customers’ requirements. This course provides a practical, management perspective of the following areas of logistics: distribution, transportation, international logistics, inventory control, sustainable logistics practices, key performance indicators, supply chain finance, leadership in a supply chain role, and an introduction to logistics technology including RFID and ERP systems. The course is designed for students who have had little or no previous coursework or professional experience in logistics. Topics includes: overview of Logistics, Supply Chain Management, Distribution Management, Inventory Management, Transportation Management, International Logistics, Sustainable Supply Chains, Applied Logistics Data Analysis, Supply Chain Finance, Logistics IT, RFID, ERP Simulation, Outsourcing Logistics, and Integrating Logistics Management Concepts. Information Systems in Business, Strategic Decision Making & E-business, Ethics and Information Security, Enterprise Architectures & Databases and Data Warehouses, Networks, Telecommunications, and Mobile Technology, Operations Management and Supply Chain Management & Customer Relationship Management and Business Intelligence, Enterprise Resource Planning and Collaboration Systems, Systems Development and Project Management & Globalization, Innovation, and 21st Century Organizational Trends Learning Outcomes

 

PMP 535: Inventory & Materials Management (1 credit)

The student will learn the theories and importance of inventory t and materials management in project settings. Students will identify the steps in receiving, verifying and reconciling project orders, stock rotation, restocking and monitoring expiry dates of project materials and over the counter medications. Return policies and recalls, and the documentation required with these activities. Students will learn how to participate in pharmaceutical waste disposal management. To identify the elements and organizations involved in material management. Topics includes: Materials management elements and functions, Organizational implications, Current and future product plans, Commodity management, Supplier selection and supply base management, Current product planning: Sales, inventory, and manufacturing plan, Materials plan: MRPII, Quality impact, Just-in-time (JIT) and distributions requirement planning (DRP), Supplier certification, Transportation, Managing inventory flow, utilizing good business, principles and practices, Inventory and the Supply Chain, Inventory Key Concepts, Inventory Replenishment Methods and Systems, Stock Control and Inventory Performance, Evaluating Inventory Performance, Inventory Strategies, Inventory Improvements

 

PMP 537: Distribution & Warehouse Management (2 credits)

This course provides an understanding of the concepts and theories that drive the effective management of an organization’s warehousing and distribution systems. This course will explain the role of warehousing and distribution management in supporting an organization’s supply chain management strategy. The course will cover topics that include Logistics Strategy and the Supply Chain, The Supply Chain Management Concept, Operations Management, Logistics and Information Technology, Demand Management, Order Processing and Customer Service, Packaging and Materials Handling, Transportation Fundamentals, Transportation Management, Distribution Center, Warehouse, and Facility Location, Inventory Management, Procurement and Supply Scheduling Decisions, Warehousing Management, International Logistics, Logistics Systems Controls, Organizing and Analyzing Logistics Systems, Future Directions and Prospects, Warehousing Layout, Design & Configuration, Receiving, Delivery, Material Storage, as well as Distribution strategies, Distribution Network planning, Distribution ERP systems (WMS) and Cross docking.

 

PMP 541: International Public Procurement – IPP (2 credits)

The International Procurement program covers the institutional, legal, financial and procedural issues involved in the procurement of goods and services by public entities and discusses reform programs to improve transparency, efficiency and accountability. It provides participants with a detailed analysis of the project-procurement cycle including a full presentation of the procurement policies of international financial institutions (IFI) such as the World Bank, and comprehensive coverage of the open tender system. The topics includes: Public Procurement Reforms, National Procurement Laws and Institutions, International Procurement, Procurement Planning, Selection of Consultants, International Competitive Bidding (ICB), Other Methods of Procurement, Contract Administration

 

PMP 545: Sourcing, Negotiating and Contracting (2 credits)

In today’s increasingly competitive and globalized world, firms are trying to find ways to improve their performance and differentiate themselves from their rivals. Clearly, suppliers can have great impact on a firm’s total cost and help in this differentiation process. Increased levels of outsourcing and off shoring make correct selection of suppliers and their quality, along with development of relationships between suppliers and producers, more crucial than ever. Whatever the supplier provides, the effective organization needs a robust system to procure the correct goods and services at the best possible price for the organization.  Topics includes: Explain the sourcing process in relation to procurement, Compare the main approaches to the sourcing of requirements from suppliers, Develop selection and award criteria that can be commonly applied when sourcing requirements from external suppliers, Explain the main consequences on supply chains when sourcing requirements from suppliers, Be able to develop a plan for sourcing goods or services from external suppliers, Choose appropriate selection criteria to inform the identification of appropriate external suppliers in the sourcing plan, Choose a balance of commercial and technical award criteria in the sourcing. Produce a plan for the sourcing of goods or services from external suppliers, Identify the main sources of information on potential suppliers’ financial performance, Calculate measures of liquidity, profitability, gearing, investment from relevant financial data on potential suppliers, Evaluate the financial performance of potential suppliers using relevant financial data, Assess commonly used sources of information on market data that can impact on the sourcing of requirements from external suppliers, Explain the main processes used for obtaining quotations and tenders, Explain the documentation that can comprise a commercial agreement for the supply of goods or services, Assess the legal issues that relate to the creation of commercial agreements with customers or suppliers, Explain the main types of contractual agreements made between customers and suppliers, Analyse the application of commercial negotiations in the work of procurement and supply, Compare the types of approaches that can be pursued in commercial negotiations, Explain how the balance of power in commercial negotiations can affect outcomes, Analyze the different types of relationships that impact on commercial negotiations, Evaluate costs and prices in commercial negotiations, Explain the economic factors that impact on commercial negotiations, Explain the main variables that can be used in a commercial negotiation, Analyse the resources required for a negotiation, Explain the stages of a commercial negotiation, Evaluate the main methods that can influence the achievement of desired outcomes, Evaluate the main communication skills that help achieve desired outcomes, Explain how to analyze the process and outcomes of the negotiations to inform future practice

 

PMP 547: Country Procurement System (2 credits)

This course is designed to introduce participants to the strategies, approaches and tools for developing effective country procurement systems. It is increasingly recognized that using a country’s own institutions and systems, including procurement, strengthens the country’s sustainable capacity to define, execute and account for its policies to its citizens. Topics includes: Overview of Public Procurement Reform and Country Procurement Systems, Legislative and Regulatory Framework, Institutional, Operational and Organizational Resources, Professional Procurement Workforce, Introducing new Procurement Policies and Practices 

 

PMP 522: Applied Financial Engineering (2 credits)

This course builds on financial accounting. The course is essential for all individuals exposed to financial information in the workplace including accountants, auditors, financial analysts, managers, bankers and oversight bodies involved in the preparation or use of company financial statements. It would also be useful for those not wishing to become accountants, but who plan to specialise in areas where accounting knowledge would be an advantage such as bankers and finance professionals, journalists, lawyers, and those interested in management positions including engineers and scientists. This course provides a quantitative approach to fixed-income securities and bond portfolio management, with a focus on fixed-income security markets. the pricing of bonds and fixed-income derivatives, the measurement and hedging of interest rate risk, dynamic models of interest rates, and the management of fixed income portfolio risk, the application of state-of-the-art quantitative techniques to asset management problems, asset pricing models in depth, portfolio optimization and construction, and dynamic strategies such as pairs trading, long-term and short-term momentum trades, and strategies that address behavioral finance anomalies, major forms of asset management structures such as mutual funds, hedge funds, ETFs, and special investment vehicles, and examines some of the primary types of trading strategies used by these organizations, implementation of derivatives trading strategies, the perspective of corporate securities as derivatives, the functions of derivatives in securities markets, and recent innovations in derivatives markets.

 

PMP 551: Modern Project Management (2 credits)

While project management is practiced as a sophisticated profession in some companies, it is still, unfortunately, misunderstood in others. Even where project management is practiced professionally, the theory behind it is often misunderstood, causing it to be practiced mechanically, rather than artistically. Modern project managers need sound management skills, as they always have. But the current generation of project managers requires theoretical and technical skills that were virtually unknown not long ago and that are continually growing more complex. A significant percentage of project managers currently use technical tools in much the same way that professional investors use technical tools. Both of these professions have well-known performance measures that are used day in and day out to assist in making decisions regarding how to employ their resources. Just as two different investors using the same technical tools can get radically different results, two different. Topics includes Subdivision of the work, quantification of the work, using modern project to create a WBS, entering WBS information, the WBS listing report, entering task data, the task budget listing report, sequencing the work, budgeting (estimating) the work, using the cost accounts entry/edit tool, budget, reports, scheduling the work, the baseline chart, project monitoring, cost reports, progress tracking, scheduling the work, the baseline chart, project monitoring, collecting actual expenditures, cost reports, progress and status reports, scientific forecasting, project performance evaluation, how is performance evaluated? Performance evaluation reports, task-naming convention, task sequencing, resource scheduling, simple scheduling, the critical path, resource scheduling, how resources are communicated to the scheduling system, using Microsoft Project to produce the resource list, pros and cons of an automated interface, the automated interface to Microsoft Project, government projects, historical perspective, government project management models, government project management vocabulary, multibudgeting vs. the tab, the meaning of WBS, government performance reporting, additional performance measures, risk management, quantification of risk, contingency draw-down, statusing contingency packages, risk management summary, rescuing a failing project, determining what went wrong, project definition, translating a definition into a plan, replanning

 

PMP 553: Program Management Leadership (1 credit)

This course is an introduction to leadership theory and practice. Students will develop an understanding of the behaviors and characteristics of leaders through examination of current leadership models. Common leadership issues and dilemmas will be examined through case studies of real world situations. Program Management Leadership: Creating Successful Team Dynamics is not a how-to for program managers or a reiteration of the Project Management Institute’s standards for program management; rather, it is focused on two key points. The first is leadership, including the styles, traits, and choices that leaders make and how they work with the stakeholder and team members to set vision, objectives, and benefits management plans to ensure that programs achieve the desired objectives. The second and most important aspect of the book is the focus on teams and how to bring disparate people together who choose, for a temporary time, to set aside their personal objectives and instead work toward those of the team and toward the program manager’s vision. Topics includes Leadership Study, Developing and Achieving a Common Vision, The History of Project and Program Management, Distinction between Portfolio, Program, and Project, Introduction to Leadership, External Factors Affecting Leadership, Individual Motivation, Leadership, Leadership in Program Management, Building Teams, Team Dynamics, High-Performing Teams (HPTs), Conflict Resolution,  Case Study in Leading Teams, Formal Processes


PMP 555: Reconstructing Project Management (2 credits)

Reconstructing Project Management is designed for the purist, the academic, the project practitioner and the project organization in equal measure. It is at times a challenging read some of what it says may clash with traditional thinking but as an aid to developing the profession and as food for the mind, it is a must-read. ‘Constructing Project Management’, covers the discipline’s history from ancient times to today showing that projects and their management have always been at mankind’s centre. The course again cover ‘Deconstructing Project Management’, its covers exceedingly well the complexity of the subject, simplifying and integrating the various conceptual elements relevant to the broad discipline of managing projects. ‘Reconstructing Project Management’, unravelling the challenges in the 21st century as well as the opportunities opening up for us. The art and science of project management is enunciated here in a way that can be grasped by all those wishing to manage change in our society. Topics includes: Historical method, bespeaking relevant knowledge, project management before it was invented, systems project management, the project management knowledge base developing project management, enterprise-wide project management (EWPM), the development of project management, deconstructing deconstruction – control, scope management, scheduling, estimating,  budgeting,  cost management, performance management (earned value), organization – roles and responsibilities, structure, structural forms, contingency theory and organization design, project management contingency, governance and strategy, managing the emerging project definition procurement and the project’s commercial   management, adding value, controlling risk, delivering quality,   safely and securely building value, achieving benefits, People – Leadership, Teams, Stakeholder Management, Culture, Individuals’ Skills and Behaviors, The Institutional Context – PMOs, Functions of the PMO, Clearing the Decks for Reconstruction

 

PMP 557: Project Estimation & Cost Management (2 credits)

Project Estimating and Cost Management covers the fundamentals of estimating projects in a discipline-independent context. It covers the essentials of project estimating, progress monitoring, and cost management, and is intended for project professionals who need a quick overview of the process of estimating the cost of projects. Special attention is focused on estimate accuracy and the issues surrounding cost and schedule overruns. Topics includes: Project Scope and Objectives, Organizational Objectives, Project Selection, Deliverable-Oriented Work Breakdown Structure, Work Breakdown Structure, WBS Development Steps,  The Division Bases, Comparison of the Different Bases, Process -Oriented Projects, Organizational Priorities,  Semantics, Changing the Paradigm, Resource Breakdown Structure, Nomenclature. Dimensions, Resource Breakdown Structure, RBS Development, Lower-Level Division Bases with a Concentration on Human Resources, Estimating the Costs, Estimating Models, Accuracy, Parametric Estimating, Modular Estimating Parametric Model, Analogous Estimating, Ratio Estimating, The Three-Quarters Rule, The Square Root Rule, The Two-Thirds Rule, Range Estimating, Expert Judgment, Normalization, Progress Monitoring Developing a Monitoring Plan, Elements of Monitoring, Earned Value, Productivity, Cost Management 81 Causes of Change, Feed -Forward Technique, Impact of Schedule on Cost 88 Lifecycle Costs, Impact of Project Risk, External Projects, Specifications, Contracts, Response to Specifications, Bidding, Project Costs, Direct Costs, Indirect Costs, Overhead, Allowance, Contingency, Project Audit, Variance analysis, cost variances, schedule variances, variance reporting, the cost performance ratio, the schedule performance ratio, productivity measurement, the productivity ratio, the productivity report.

 

PMP 559: Lean Management (1 credit)

Lean project management uses the principles from lean manufacturing to focus on delivering value with less waste and reduced time.Project Management encompasses all the activities involved in getting project done, including planning, storing, moving and accounting for inventory. Inventory availability is the most important aspect of customer service, and the cost of inventory is one of the most important entries on a company’s balance sheet. Recognition of the balance sheet implications of inventory in project management has launched a variety of industry-wide inventory reduction initiatives. Despite all these initiatives to reduce inventory in the supply chain, inventory levels for most companies have remained the same or increased. This course is focused on understanding how to efficiently provide the inventory necessary for good project service while minimizing the inventory resulting from poor supply chain management. Topic includes: Introduction to Lean Management, Types of Lean Management, Lean Management Tools, Lean in Manufacturing, Lean in Service, Lean in Office, Lean Metrics, Other Methodologies That Complement Lean, Lean Maturity Matrix.

 

PMP 577: Business Practicum (2 credits) 

Participants investigate core aspects of business and industry within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and real world situations. Students may pursue practicum through a supervised practice, apprenticeship, professional practice, advanced field study or other external exploration under the direction of a qualified mentor and an approved field site sponsor. Students participate in the practicum for a minimum of 50 contact hours. The field placement is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands on experience and in-depth knowledge of a specific area of business. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for the practicum.

 

Research Preparation 

 

RES 520: Business Research (3 credits) 

Participants will examine research tools, techniques, and resources used to development analytical ability and techniques to gather and present data in viable forms of business communication.  

 

RES 504: Introductory Research Statistics (3 credits) 

This course covers the basic statistical concepts, theory and methods in statistical research. Topics include variables, graphs, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, probability theory, binomial, normal and Poisson distributions, statistical sampling theory, and statistical decision theory.  

 

RES 506: Advanced Research Statistics (3 credits) 

This course covers parametric and nonparametric hypothesis testing. Topics include  sampling theory, Chi-square test, least squares regression, correlation theory, non-linear regression, analysis of variance, Student’s t-test, and various methods in nonparametric analyses.  

 

RES 508: Qualitative Research (3 credits) 

This course provides detailed study of qualitative research methods. Topics survey historical and theoretical foundations of qualitative research, explore major qualitative research strategies, and build an understanding of the art and science of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative information. The course provides background on applied qualitative research, the politics and ethics of qualitative inquiry, and the major paradigms that inform and influence qualitative research.  

 

RES 510: Participatory Action Research (3 credits) 

This course provides the foundational principles of participatory action research. Topics survey theoretical foundations of action research, the methodology and applications of PAR in contemporary culture. Students assess the rigor and usefulness of participatory action research in addressing major world problems. 

Finishing Activities

EXM 880: Comprehensive Review (2 credits)

Masters participants complete this comprehensive examination as a required element of their academic program, prior to undertaking the thesis. The examination usually includes both written and oral components and is confined to the programs of studies completed by the participant.

 

RES 885: Business Project Proposal (4 credits)
This course is required of all Master’s participants designed to guide them through the formal research proposal process for their final projects, including the development of the research method, data gathering device and data analysis techniques. Participants also prepare brief review of literature and bibliographies of the major scholarly works informing their project.

 

RES 890: Business Project (8 credits)
This course governs the conduct of the thesis project for the Master’s level participant. The Master’s thesis is the demonstration of the mastery of a body of knowledge in a given field and is presented in a manuscript usually 50 or more pages in length. The final project may take any of several forms, depending upon the field of study and the expectations of faculty. This may be quantitative or qualitative research, participatory action research, or a major project demonstrating excellence. Master’s participants may re-enroll for this course for no-credit, as needed.

 

EXM 895: Oral Review of Business Project (2 credits)

This examination is an oral review of the business project thesis conducted by the graduate committee.

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