Bachelor of Science

Akamai University

Dr. David Ackah & Dr. Gabriel Odeh Apotey

Institute of Project Management Professionals

Approved; 06 May 2017

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The demand for project managers is increasingly vital to many areas of business today as a result of organizations embarking on complex projects with the view to creating unique products and services. Projects specification, scope statement and profiling require expert knowledge in cost, time, and quality management. The Bachelor Degree Program is structured to train students to apply contemporary project management principles, tools, and concepts to mitigate and manage challenges associated with modern project execution.

The effective management of an organization’s project impact on the achievement of its goals. This goal is sometimes lost if the organization lacks key management personnel trained to manage the complexity of projects. The program seeks to provide students with opportunity to enhance their skills as project managers dealing with project planning and control, project implementation and management, and managing any risks associated with projects. Students will be able to use tools and methods efficiently and effectively, and introduce the most suitable technology to ensure success of their future projects.

Regards,

Dr. David Ackah, PhD. FPMP – Program Director, Project Management Programs

Dr. Gabriel Odeh Apotey, PhD. CPMC – Program Coordinators

ENTRY REQUIREMENT

As prerequisites for acceptance to the Bachelor of Science in Project Management, participants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized Senior Secondary School Certificate, Higher National Diploma, and any recognized certificate from the a Professional Body in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful and increasingly responsible experience in the field of project management, project finance, project engineering, project procurement engineering and industry. The Bachelor’s degree requirement is never waived. However, on occasion, well qualified applicants are accepted to the Master of Science lacking elements of preparation. Under these conditions, participants are required to add the missing competencies at the onset of their program, at further expense. Participants should be proficient in collegiate English language skills, have access to a computer, email, and the Internet, and business journals and library resources to support study and research.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor’s participants must accumulate a minimum total of 120 semester credits toward the degree, as outlined by the University. In addition to the credit requirements for the business concentration, participants must complete the senior project and written final examination.

The Akamai University Bachelor of Science in Project Management is designed and intended to be conducted in a four year program of study.  Note that, Akamai University accepts up to 90 semester credits in transfer from other recognized colleges and universities, corporate training, professional awarding bodies, associations, and approved formal non-college training organizations.  Students may also earn credit from prior learning assessment via portfolio reviews and challenge examinations. All students must earn a minimum of 30 semester credits during enrollment at the University and maintain good standing for an enrollment period of at least one calendar year.

Required: The equivalent of 90 semester credits in transfer of college courses of business training and prior learning assessment from portfolio reviews and challenge examinations.  A section on importing credit from prior college and training and learning professional achievements is discussed later in this program overview.

  • Core Academic Studies (90 credits)
  • Major Concentration (21 credits)
  • Business Practicum (3 credits)
  • Major Project (3 credits)
  • Final Examination (3 credits)

 

Core Academic Studies (Required: 90 credits) 

These course modules are the foundational competencies in theories, principles, and practices, and the historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the discipline. These courses represent the essential elements, which define your field of Project Management and establish the underlying foundations upon which participants base their advanced professional development. Core coursework examines the details of project management, lean management, project procurement engineering, organizational behavior, human resource management, strategic management, financial management, and logistics and supply chain management and includes a mandated Business Practicum in the student’s major concentration. Participants complete core foundational studies, as outlined below:

Year 1 Semester 1 (15 credits)

PMP 101: Quantitative Methods (3 credits)

PMP 103: Project Scope Management (3 credits)

PMP 105: Management of Projects (3 credits)

PMP 107: Project Accounting (3 credits)

PMP 109: Project Communication Management (3 credits)

 

Year 1 Semester 2 (15 credits)

PMP 102: Project Administration Management (3 credits)

PMP 104: Project Operation Management (3 credits)

PMP 106: Project Six Sigma (3 credits)

PMP 108: Project Cost & Management Accounting (3 credits)

PMP 110: Principles Operations Research (3 credits)

Year 2 Semester 1 (15 credits)

PMP 201: International Project Management (3 credits)

PMP 203: Project Engineering Management (3 credits)

PMP 205: Project Planning & Time Management (3 credits)

PMP 207: Project Procurement & Contract Management (3 credits)

PMP 209: Project Strategic Management (3 credits)

Year 2 Semester 2 (15 credits

PMP 202: Management Information Systems (3 credits)

PMP 204: Lean Management (3 credits)

PMP 206: Project Human Resource Management (3 credits)

PMP 208: Advance Operations Research (3 credits)

PMP 210: Project Law & Ethics (3 credits)

Year 3 Semester 1 (15 credits)

PMP 301: Total Quality Management (3 credits)

PMP 303: Project Safety Management (3 credits)

PMP 305: Project Risk and Technology Evaluation (3 credits)

PMP 307: Cost Analysis & Project Evaluation (3 credits)

PMP 309: Project Sourcing, Negotiating and Contracting (3 credits)

 
Year 3 Semester 2 (15 credits)

PMP 302: Project Portfolio Management (3 credits)

PMP 304: Project Integration Management   (3 credits)

PMP 306: Application of Project Management & Software (3 credits)

PMP 308: Project Management Leadership (3 credits)

PMP 310: Project Quality Management (3 credits)

OTE: Alternative core studies may be negotiated by the student with the Program Director.

 

Major Concentration (Required: 30 credits) 

Requirements for this part of the program include completion of specialized modules in business administration, including a business practicum and a senior project exploring a project management concentration in any one of the following areas of study in Project Management:

  • Project Management Engineering
  • Project Procurement Engineering
  • Project Financial Engineering
  • Applied Project Financial Economics

Project Management Engineering

Year 4 Semester 1 (15 credits)

PMP 401: Project Management Maturity Model (3 credits)

PMP 403: Project Management Consultancy Theory (3 credits)

PMP 405: Managerial Economics for Decision Making (3 credits)

PMP 407: Project Manpower Management (3 credits)

PMP 409: Business Practicum (3 credits)

Year 4 Semester 2 (15 credits)

PMP 402: Reconstructing Project Management (3 credits)

PMP 404: Project Estimation & Cost Management (3 credits)

PMP 406: Project Change Management (3 credits)

PMP 408: Program Management Leadership (3 credits)

PMP 410: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)

PMP 480: Senior Project (3 credits)

PMP 499: Final Examination (3 credits)

 

Project Procurement Engineering

 Year 4 Semester 1 (15 credits)

PMP 411: Technology in Reverse Logistics Operations (3 credits)

PMP 405: Managerial Economics for Decision Making (3 credits)

PMP 415: Inventory & Materials Management (3 credits)

PMP 417: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)

PMP 409: Business Practicum (3 credits)

 

Year 4 Semester 2 (15 credits)

PMP 410: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)

PMP 414: Country Procurement System (3 credits)

PMP 416: Distribution & Warehouse Management (3 credits)

PMP 418: International Public Procurement – IPP (3 credits)

PMP 480: Senior Project (3 credits)

PMP 499: Final Examination (3 credits)

Project Financial Engineering

 Year 4 Semester 1 (15 credits)

 PMP 421: Payroll Accounting Management (3 credits)

 PMP 405: Managerial Economics for Decision Making (3 credits)

 PMP 425: International Accounting Standards (IFRS, IAS, IPSAS) (3 credits)

 PMP 425: Financial Derivatives & Securities (3 credits)

PMP 409: Business Practicum (3 credits)

 

Year 4 Semester 2 (15 credits)

PMP 421: Commercial Risk and Insurance Management (3 credits)
PMP 423: Fraud Examination & Forensics Account (3 credits)

PMP 417: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)
PMP 427: Financial Reporting & Market Analysis (3 credits)

PMP 480: Senior Project (3 credits)

PMP 499: Final Examination (3 credits)

Applied Project Financial Economics

 Year 4 Semester 1 (15 credits)

PMP 431: Micro & Macro Economics (3 credits)

PMP 433: Mathematics for Economists (3 credits)

PMP 405: Managerial Economics for Decision Making (3 credits)

PMP 436: International Economics (3 credits)

PMP 409: Business Practicum (3 credits)

Year 4 Semester 2 (15 credits)

PMP 432: Econometric (3 credits)

PMP 434: Industrial Economics (3 credits)

PMP 417: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)

PMP 438: Economic Integration & Sustainable Development   (3 credits)

PMP 480: Senior Project (3 credits)

PMP 499: Final Examination (3 credits)

 

PROGRAM FACULTY  

Dr. David Ackah, PhD. Program Director, Project Management Engineering

Dr. Gabriel Odeh Apotey, PhD. Program Coordinator, Project Financial Engineering

Dr. Samuel Amoako, PhD. Applied Project Financial Engineering

Makafui R. A. Ackah, MSc, MCIPS. Project Procurement Engineering

Dr. Samuel Afotey Annang, PhD. Program Registrar

PROCESS OF PROGRAM COMPLETION  

 Step #1: Assignment of Faculty Review Committee 

After the participant’s admission and registration, as the first step in the program, the University will assign the participant’s Graduate Review Committee, including a Chair and one supportive faculty member. Once the Committee Chair has been assigned, the participant shall begin the preliminary activities of the degree program.

Step #2: Study Plan Process 

The first activity of the program is the completion of the Study Plan document, which guides the participant and review committee through the degree process. The Study Plan clarifies the specialization that will be pursued, itemizes the Master of Business Administration subject modules, and clarifies the project activities to be completed as expectations for the degree, and includes a timeline for completion of activities.

 Step #3: Core Foundational Subjects 

Participants enter the core subject phase of their program, completing six modules.

Step #4: Major Concentration

Participants continue the subject module phase of their program, completing three modules in a selected area of focus including the business practicum.

Step #5: Business Practicum

After completion of the subject in the Business Concentration, participants investigate core aspects of business and industry within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and real world situations. Students may pursue practicum through a supervised practice, apprenticeship, professional employment position, advanced field study or other external exploration under the direction of a qualified

 
Step #6: Senior Project

Once all academic classes and the practicum are finished, a Senior Project is completed.  This is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student’s overall academic competencies relative to academic studies. Students are provided an opportunity to investigate an area of special interest in their concentration within project management, which has potential for advancing their profession development.

Step #7: Final Examination 

Once the coursework and Senior Project are completed successfully, the faculty advisor schedules the Final Examination. The administration and an assigned faculty specialist representing the student’s primary academic area conduct the final examination.

COURSE MODULE DESCRIPTIONS  

Core Academic Studies 

PMP 101: Quantitative Methods (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to both basic and advanced analytical tools for business disciplines. Beginning with simple statistical methods, the course builds to more robust analytical techniques such as multivariate linear regression. Emphasis is placed on theoretical understanding of concepts as well as the application of key methodologies used by industry. This course also aims to promote a critical perspective on the use of statistical and econometric information. The course cover collection of Data, Presentation of Numerical Information, Descriptive Statistics for Frequency Distribution, Correlation & Regression, Time Series Introduction to Quantitative Techniques, Linear Programming (Graphical Method), Linear Programming (Simplex Method), Linear Programming (Transportation Method), Forecasting, Decision Analysis

 

PMP 103: Project Scope Management (3 credits)

This course is intended to enable you to perform the tasks of incorporate the processes of the Project Scope Management Knowledge Area into day-to-day project management activities. This course cover introduction to Project Scope Management, Plan Scope Management, Collect Requirements, Define Scope, Create WBS, Validate Scope, Control Scope

 

PMP 105: Management of Projects (3 credits)

The demand for project managers is increasingly vital to many areas of business today as a result of organizations embarking on complex projects with the view to creating unique products and services. Projects specification, scope statement and profiling require expert knowledge in cost, time, and quality management. The course is structured to train students to apply contemporary project management principles, tools, and concepts to mitigate and manage challenges associated with modern project execution. The course cover an overview of project management, and the role of the project management, Planning the project, developing a mission, vision, goals, and objectives for the project, Creating the project risk plan,  and using the work breakdown structure to plan a plan, Scheduling project work, producing workable schedule, Project control and evaluation, the change control process, project control using earn value analysis, Managing the project team, the project manager as leader, How to make project management work in your life

 

PMP 107: Project Accounting (3 credits)

Upon completion of this course, the student will demonstrate an understanding of basic accounting theory and perform the accounting required for an accounting cycle. The student will perform the fundamentals required to record, summarize and analyse the transactions of a business and prepare and interpret the resultant financial statements. The student will also account for payroll and assets (cash, notes, and accounts receivable inventories, plant and equipment, and intangibles). The course cover principles of Accounting, Financial Statements and Underlying Principles, Recording Basic Business Transactions for a Service Company, Adjustment of Recorded Data, Preparation of Financial Statements, Preparation of Spreadsheets and the Closing Process, Accounting for a Merchandising Company, Classified Statements, Analysis, and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, Use of Special Journals and Subsidiary Ledgers, Bank Reconciliations, Petty Cash, Vouchers, Accounts Receivable and Notes Receivable .

 

PMP 109: Project Communication Management (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the diverse aspects of communication and managing documentation projects. It teaches the planning skills necessary to develop document outlines, budgets, and schedules, and how to combine this information into document plans, proposals, and contracts. It introduces the project execution skills needed at each stage of the documentation process, and teaches how to track and report project progress. It addresses issues surrounding multi-person documentation teams, such as managing personnel, dividing and delegating work, and establishing effective writing and editing processes. This course also teaches global management skills, including document control, copyright, meetings and presentations. The cover introduction to documentations, Establishing Practice, Editing, Writing A Project Report, Preparing Project Presentation, Handling Of Project Files Communications Overview, Assess Your Communications Style, Project Communications Planning, Performance Reporting And Forecasting Project Closing (Lessons Learned, Your Ultimate Training Resource, & Final Project Report) Templates, Responsibility Assignment Matrix, Stakeholder Analysis, Communications Plan, Issues Log, Project Status Report, Lessons Learned Log &Final Project Report

 

PMP 102: Project Administration Management (3 credits)

This course introduces major concepts and tools used to design, control, and improve business processes from the principles of PRINCE2. For various types of operations that produce tangible goods or intangible services, the course covers issues and topics in PRINCE2 such as process measurement; bottleneck management; service improvement; process synchronization and improvement; statistical quality control techniques and six sigma approaches. There will be lectures, cases, team projects and an in-class simulation game. The course cover an overview of PRINCE2, starting up a project (SU), & Initiating a Project (IP), Directing a Project (DP), Controlling a Project Stage (CPS), & Managing Product Delivery (MPD), Managing Stage Boundaries (MSB), & Closing the Project (CP), Planning, Business Case, Project Organization, Plans, Controls, Quality, Risk, &  Change Control, Configuration Management, Product-based Planning, Quality Review, & Project Management Team Role

 

PMP 104: Project Operation Management (3 credits)

This course examines the functional area of production and operations management in the manufacturing industry. Topics include decision-making, capacity planning, aggregate planning, forecasting, and inventory management, distribution planning, materials requirements planning (MRP), project management and quality control. This covers introduction to Operations Management, Operations Strategies, Product Design & Process Selection, Total quality Management, Statistical Quality Control, Supply Chain Management, JIT & Lean System, Capacity Planning, Facility Location & Layout, Work Design, Project Management, and Inventory Management

PMP 106: Project Six Sigma (3 credits)

Six Sigma is a type of quality control management that is quickly becoming an essential component of many companies who want to succeed.  There are many companies already utilizing this methodology, companies such as Lockheed Martin, Eastman Kodak Company, and Target Cooperation. Perhaps your place of employment wants to adopt this business philosophy throughout the organization and is requesting that employees like you become instructed in the methodology. The course cover overview of Six Sigma, Value of Six Sigma Recognize why organizations use Six Sigma and understand the origins of Six Sigma. Organizational Drivers and Metrics Recognize key drivers for business (profit, market share, customer satisfaction, efficiency, product differentiation) and how key metrics and scorecards are developed and impact the entire organization. Process Elements Define and describe SIPOC, Owners and Stakeholders Identify process owners, internal and external customers, and other stakeholders in a project. Identify Customers and Customer Segmentation Identify and classify internal and external customers as applicable to a particular project, and show how projects impact customers. Collect and Classify Customer Data VOC, Survey Methods, Kano Analysis. Translate Customer Requirements Translate customer feedback into project goals and objectives, including critical to quality (CTQ) attributes and requirements statements. Use of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) to translate customer requirements into performance measures. Project Identification and Planning Tools Define, select, and use: 1) Affinity Diagrams 2) Interrelationship Digraphs 3) Tree Diagrams 4) Prioritization Matrices 5) Matrix Diagrams 6) Process Decision Program (PDPC) Charts 7) Activity Network Diagrams – Gantt Charts, PERT and CPM. Organizational Goals and Six Sigma Projects Describe the project selection process including knowing when to use Six Sigma DMAIC methodology. Project Charter and Project Metrics Define and describe elements of a Project Charter. Development of metrics – COQ, DPU, DPMO, RTY. Team Stages and DMAIC Define and describe the stages of team evolution, including forming, storming, norming, performing, adjourning, and connectivity with DMAIC. Six Sigma – Team Roles and Responsibilities Describe and define the roles and responsibilities of participants on Six Sigma teams, including black belt, master black belt, green belt, champion, executive, coach, facilitator, team member, sponsor, process owner, etc.

 

PMP 108: Project Cost & Management Accounting (3 credits)

This course seeks to give an understanding of the ways in which management accountants can provide relevant information for a variety of decisions to be made in managing any Project. On completion of this course, students should be able to identify, use, and interpret the results of costing techniques appropriate to different activities and decisions; formulate and use standards and budgets for planning and control purposes; understand the role of responsibility accounting and performance measurement; understand the behavioural implications of performance measurement and transfer pricing systems in divisionalised businesses; appreciate the need to relate management accounting systems to contemporary thinking about organisational planning and control. The course cover Management accounting in context, Introduction to cost terms & inventory costing, Cost behaviour, Cost volume profit analysis, Decision making & relevant information, Job costing, Process costing, Activity-based costing, Activity-based management, Master budget, Responsibility accounting, Cost management and capacity costing, Pricing decisions &customer-profitability analysis, Overhead costs, Common costs & revenues, Standard cost: DM & DL, Standard cost: MOH, Inventory management, Transfer pricing

 

PMP 110: Principles Operations Research (3 credits)

Operations Research studies analysis and planning of complex systems. This course will focus on mathematical modelling. A strong emphasis will be given to model formulation. On the methodology side, Linear and Integer Programming techniques will be introduced. At the end of the course, students will have the skills to build their own formulations, to expand existing formulations, to critically evaluate the impact of model assumptions and to choose an appropriate solution technique for a given formulation. The course cover, the art and science of executive decisions, Formulations of Linear optimization models, Algebraic & Geometric representations of linear optimization models, Simplex method of solution, Sensitivity testing & duality, Transportation problems, Shortest-route & other network models, Introduction to dynamic optimization models, Dynamic optimization of inventory scheduling, Other examples of dynamic programming, Decision making over an unbounded horizon, Optimization methods for an unbounded horizon, Integer programming & combination models

 

PMP 201: International Project Management (3 credits)

The International Project Management Course offers a comprehensive and thorough program that focuses on the projects of temporal cooperation between organizations (business teams) established in order to achieve a certain goal in projects. This course is to nurture international project management professionals who can combine the latest research in management and specialized business practices and who are ready to meet challenges and contribute to the diverse and harmonious development of society. The course cover International project management context, difficulties and risks of international projects, the ground work, and the game plane, Organizing and staffing the project, financial controls as a management tool, risk management, metrics and quality management, and offsets, Trade studies, working the project, working the problems, policy evaluation, contract management, development management, project finance, risk management, disaster management, international mega project management, etc. as well as business writing and negotiation

 

PMP 203: Project Engineering Management (3 credits)

This course encompasses the key elements of operations management and investment analysis and pulls them together in a coherent format that allows you to understand the ‘big picture’ as well as ‘the specific details’. It is aimed at integrating the knowledge gained from the different engineering subjects you have studied into a framework and process that allows you to implement your solutions and ideas in a commercial environment. Engineers have traditionally played an important role in management, largely because design and technology were the main key factors for success in product and process design, but also the fact that our engineering degree gave us outstanding analytical skills to solve a multitude of problems. This really hasn’t changed, but in an increasingly complex world, successful organizations – public, private or governmental – need managers with increasingly broad and diverse skills, especially in finance, law, risk and quality management, and customer relations. And more to the point, organizations need leaders at every level, with the ability to make carefully considered and innovative long-term strategic decisions. It is the purpose of to equip you with enough knowledge and information to become a global manager, indeed a leader, with the ability to apply analytical methods and quality processes to create short and long term value for your organization, your customers, and the community, in other words, all stakeholders. The course cover Project & Project Management, Value Management, Project Appraisal & Risk Management, Project Management & Quality, Environmental Management, Project Financing, Cost Estimation in Projects & Contract, Project Control using Earned Value Control, Project Stakeholders, Contracts Strategies & Contract Selection Process, Contract Policy & Documentation, Project Organization Design and Structure, Design Management, Supply Chain Management, Team-Base Supply Chain & Partnership, Private Finance Initiate & Public-Private Partnership, Aspect of implementing of industrial Project, Project Management in Developing Countries, The future of Engineering Project Management,

 

PMP 205: Project Planning & Time Management (3 credits)

This course is primarily designed for project managers or individuals who have had project management training or experience, including exposure to basic project management techniques such as scope, activity, and resource planning. Individuals taking this course should have at least two years of experience working on project teams. This course focuses on both the process, control, analysis, & scheduling and the management of the process quality for creating project deliverables. It provides exposure to the tools, techniques, and metrics used to ensure that sufficient product and process quality is achieved. It includes assignments which allow participants to learn how to plan quality into a project and determine key metrics to manage project and process quality. The course cover Plan Schedule Management, Define Activities, Sequence Activities, Estimate Activity resources, Estimate Activity durations, Develop Schedule &Control Schedule Activity duration, Duration uncertainty (PERT), Milestone planning, Bar charts, construction & use, Schedule development methods, Project Networks (CPM), Working with float, Activities & Delays& Complex relationships. The course cover Initiating a Project, Planning Project Work, Developing Project Schedules, Developing Cost Estimates and Budgets, Planning Project Quality, Staffing, and Communications, Analyzing Risks and Planning Risk Responses, Planning Project Procurement, Executing Project Work, Managing Project Procurement, Monitoring and Controlling Project Work, Monitoring and Controlling Project Performance and Quality, Monitoring and Controlling Project Risk and Procurements, Closing the Project

 

PMP 207: Project Procurement & Contract Management (3 credits)

This course is designed for project managers who will have procurement responsibilities and for those who will interact with designated procurement professionals. The objective of Project Procurement Management is to prepare the project manager and project management team to effectively manage the procurement and contracting aspects of a project. The course begins with introductory sections explaining legal concepts of contracts and contract pricing. Then the Project Procurement Management Knowledge Area processes are presented: Plan Procurements, Conduct Procurements, Administer Procurements, and Close Procurements. The processes in Project Procurement Management are initiated early in the project – with a procurement management plan – and are ongoing throughout the life of the project. The course cover Introduction to Project Procurement Management, Legal Concepts of Contracts, Contract Types, Practice Exercise, Plan Procurements, Conduct Procurements, Administer Procurements, Close Procurements, Procurement Management for Sellers, Overview of Procurement from the Seller’s Perspective, Business Development, Proposal Preparation, Contract Negotiation and Execution, Contract Administration, Contract Closure

PMP 209: Project Strategic Management (3 credits)

This course explores the issues of defining corporate mission, objectives, and goals. Participants focus on the analysis of the firm’s external and internal environment to identify and create competitive advantage in a global context. It emphasizes the cultural, ethical, political, and regulatory issues faces any global business environment and the need for leadership for a successful management of strategic change. The course will high level of understanding of theories, models, issues and debates regarding strategic management as practiced in the public sector in the context of 21st century society; knowledge of some important tools and techniques of strategic analysis and management; high level of understanding of the versions of strategic management, namely managing for outcomes‘ and now results-based management. The course covers topics of mission, goal, strategy formulation, strategy implementation and strategy evaluation. Strategic techniques include Industry: Analysis, Analysis of the Competitive Environment, Key Success Factors, Strategic Scenario Analysis and SWOT Analysis. Additional topics covered include strategic thinking, competitive advantage, vertical and horizontal integration, and planning horizon.

 

PMP 202: Management Information Systems (3 credits)

The Course is to examine the role of information systems in supporting a wide range of organizational functions. The aim of this course is to enable students to appreciate the opportunities and problems that managers in a wide range of organizations face as they attempt to use these information technology (IT) applications to add value to their businesses. The courses explains basic concepts for IT/IS management discusses organizational, business and strategic issues surrounding IT/IS, and analyze and evaluate uses of strategic IT/IS in practice. Topics to be treated includes; the strategic role of information systems, information systems and organizations, information, management, and decision making, the challenge of information systems, managing data resources, managing international information systems and ethical and social impact of information systems. Topics to be treated includes;Define information systems, Explain how information systems transform business, Establish the value that information systems have for a business, Name the disciplines involved in information systems, business processes, Recognize how systems serve different groups in business, how systems improve organizational performance, technology contributes towards collaboration and teamwork within a company, the strategic role of information systems, information systems and organizations, information, management, and decision making, the challenge of information systems, managing data resources, managing international information systems and ethical and social impact of information systems.

 

PMP 204: Lean Management (3 credits)

Lean project management uses the principles from lean manufacturing to focus on delivering value with less waste and reduced time.Project Management encompasses all the activities involved in getting project done, including planning, storing, moving and accounting for inventory. Inventory availability is the most important aspect of customer service, and the cost of inventory is one of the most important entries on a company’s balance sheet. Recognition of the balance sheet implications of inventory in project management has launched a variety of industry-wide inventory reduction initiatives. Despite all these initiatives to reduce inventory in the supply chain, inventory levels for most companies have remained the same or increased. This course is focused on understanding how to efficiently provide the inventory necessary for good project service while minimizing the inventory resulting from poor supply chain management. Topics includes introduction to Lean Management, Types of Lean Management, Lean Management Tools, Lean in Manufacturing, Lean in Service, Lean in Office, Lean Metrics, Other Methodologies That Complement Leant

 

PMP 206: Project Human Resource Management (3 credits)

Project Management human resource management course will provide the answers you need. This programme focuses on how to maximize value for the project and organization by applying project management essentials. Most time is spent on the 20% of effort that delivers 80% of project value. During this course, you will be given a solid introduction to project management tools, techniques and methodologies including international trends and best practice project management techniques. You will be taken through a project life cycle from project initiation to the close-out stage. Finally there is a demo of using Microsoft Project to create high value dynamic schedules that clearly communicate how a project will be successfully delivered (the techniques shown are applicable to schedules created with any tool). Topics includes Plan Human resource Management, Acquire Project team, Develop Project team, Manage Project tea, HR and the PM lifecycle overview, Staff acquisition, Team building, Team motivation, Assess your leadership style, Assess your conflict management style, Discussion on Burn-out and how it relates to IT project, alternative planning strategies for conditions of uncertainty; organizations and project cycle management; the political environment; and interactions of clients and advisers, engineers, planners, policy analysts, and other professionals. Project Human Resource Management include the following: Organizational influences, Organizational structure, Human resource planning, Staff management plans and acquisition, Developing the project team, Team building and leadership, Approaches to conflict. Introduction to Project Stakeholder Management, Identify Stakeholders, Plan Stakeholder Management, Manage Stakeholder Engagement, Control Stakeholder Engagement, Introduction to Project Communications Management, Plan Communications Management, Manage Communications, & Control Scope

PMP 208: Advance Operations Research    (3 credits)                    

Operations Research studies analysis and planning of complex systems. This course will focus on mathematical modelling. A strong emphasis will be given to model formulation. On the methodology side, Linear and Integer Programming techniques will be introduced. At the end of the course, students will have the skills to build their own formulations, to expand existing formulations, to critically evaluate the impact of model assumptions and to choose an appropriate solution technique for a given formulation. Topics includes Optimization with a nonlinear objective function, Advance techniques in none nonlinear programming, Introduction to stochastic programming models, Probabilistic dynamic programming models, Probabilities dynamic inventory models, Waiting line models, Computer simulation of management systems, Implementation of operations research

 

PMP 210: Project Law & Ethics (3 credits)

Professional Ethics for Project Managers provides a thought-provoking look into the application of business ethics within project management. This course provides a real-world method for ensuring that ethical practices are adapted and implemented within the project environment. This course covers legal, ethical and contractual issues related to the effective management and administration of construction projects. Focus on the roles and responsibilities of project managers to contractors and suppliers. Improve your ability as a project manager to make sound decisions by gaining a greater understanding of the practical implications of legal precedents and ethical requirements. Discuss legal cases and dispute situations. The course will cover Course Introduction, Nature and Sources of Law, Litigation vs. Alternative Dispute Resolution, Torts, Contracts, Property Law, Intellectual Property, Employment Law, Criminal Law and Business, Business Organizations, Business Regulation, Business Ethics, Fundamental Principles, Integrity, Objectivity, Professionals Competence & Due Care, Confidentiality, Professional Behaviour, Introduction, Threats and Safeguard, Professional Appointment Client Acceptance, Changes in a Professionals Appointment, Safeguard, Conflict of Interest, Acting Professionally, Relationship with Customers, Clients & Employers, Confidentiality of Information, Taking Responsibility of your own Actions, Duty to the Project Team, Respecting Differences in Diverse Cultures, Strategies, Your Commitment to the Profession, Conduct with Project Contractor, Corruption, Business Gift & Hospitality, Other Policies, Introduction, Code of Conduct, Charter and Bye Laws, IPMP Governance, Disciplinary Committee, Making a Complaint Members, Disciplinary Committee Members, The Stages of the Disciplinary Process, The Legal Position, IPMP Members Submission to the Code of Conduct

 

PMP 301: Total Quality Management (3 credits)

Total Quality Management (TQM) is a scientific approach for management and employees to be involved in the continuous improvement of processes underlying the production of goods and services. This approach is fundamental in business, industry, evidence-based medicine and many other disciplines. Candidates who complete this course will be able to critically appraise management techniques, choose appropriate statistical techniques for improving processes and write reports to management describing processes and recommending ways to improve them. People need to be aware of what they can and can’t do with data. Management is limited to what it knows and so too is the organisation. Awareness of statistical techniques and their use is paramount to collecting information and making decisions. Quantitative skills are necessary in order to make decisions – else you are just another person with an opinion. The course will cover Deming Quality philosophy (and that of other Quality theorists), understanding variability of processes through statistical thinking, the role of management and leadership in a TQM organisation, the role of quality improvement teams and how to organise them, the “seven simple tools”; data collection through surveys and experimental design; basic statistical methods; more advanced statistical techniques such as control charts, statistical process control and experimental design; quality standards (ISO9000); complementary quality techniques such as benchmarking, Strategic Project Portfolio Management: Enabling a Productive Organization (Microsoft Executive Leadership Series) by Simon Moore. Overview of requirements management, Why Plan? Business Case for Requirements Management (Definition, Purpose, When? Contents), Stakeholder roles and responsibilities; Requirements estimation; Requirements management process; Requirement type definition; Requirement type / artefact mapping; Naming and numbering convention; Requirements prioritisation; Requirements traceability; Requirements versioning; Requirements baseline; Requirements metrics; Requirements scope management (change control); Requirements re-use; Requirement packages and organisation; Requirements communication; Tools; Common Myths & Issues; Critical Success Factors.

PMP 303: Project Safety Management  (3 credits)

This course introduces the student to the study of workplace occupational health and safety. The student will learn safe work practices in offices, industry and construction as well as how to identify and prevent or correct problems associated with occupational safety and health in these locations as well as in the home. The course is designed to assist the student with the implementation of safe healthy practices at work and at home. Topics includes Personal Health and Safety, Personal Safety, Accidents & Their Effect on Industry, Theories of Accidents-(Essay-Select 1 of the following theories, WHMIS Workplace Hazardous Material Information System, Falling, Impact, Acceleration and Lifting Hazards, Workers Compensation, Roles of Health and Safety Personnel

PMP 305: Project Risk and Technology Evaluation (3 credits)

This course looks at Project risk exposures and how these risks are addressed. Project risk management is a life-long process that involves five steps: identification, evaluation, control, financing and monitoring risks associated with project. Project risks can be managed with control techniques or can be financed using insurance. The course covers different types of project insurance such as natural disaster, health, property and automobile insurance and including methods to calculate insurance needs.  The course covers different types of project insurance such as natural disaster, health, property and automobile insurance and including methods to calculate insurance needs. Plan Risk Management, Identify Risk, Analysing Potential Risk Probability and Impact, Analysing Risks Using Monte Carlo Analysis MethodsBuilding a Risk Response Plan: How should the project manager address each recognized risk, assign it to project team members, build in contingencies, develop a mitigation or avoidance strategy, and accept the risk, Selecting Project Control Tools Using Proportionate Expenditure. Fiscal Policy and Fiscal Management, Economics of Corruption, Public Sector Ethics, Procurement and Infrastructure, Transfer and Payments: false claims and false statements. Detection and Preventing – Best Practices: Whistle blowing, Anti-Corruption Programs, Anti-Corruption Tools, Governance, Anti-Fraud and Corruption Codes and the Ten-element model for Fraud and Corruption Control.

 

PMP 307: Cost Analysis & Project Evaluation (3 credits)

This course will examine projects that are commonly evaluated using benefit-cost analysis, and the appropriate methods for determining their cost effectiveness. Topics include project evaluation techniques; measuring welfare change; correcting for market distortions using shadow wages and prices; finding the appropriate discount rate; making valid valuations that incorporate inflation and appropriate planning horizon, scrap, and spillover and secondary effects; public enterprise pricing rules; valuing intangibles; and incorporating risk and uncertainty. Case studies of projects are analyzed from a variety of areas, such as natural resources, the environment, human resources, public service, and transportation. Topics includes introduction, Benefit-cost analysis, Applications, Project Evaluation Techniques, Discounting, Time-stream evaluation and investment criteria, Review of relevant parts of microeconomics, Purely competitive standard, Market failure, Monopoly, Assessing Costs and Benefits, Measuring welfare change, Compensation and potential pareto, Measuring welfare changes, Correcting market distortions, Shadow wages and prices, Choosing a discount rates, Valid valuations, Inflation, starting dates, planning horizons, scrap, Spillover and secondary effects, Public enterprise pricing rules, Natural monopoly, two-part tariffs, Optimal departures from marginal cost pricing, Valuing intangibles, Noise abatement, Value of life, value of time, Risk and uncertainty, Project Identification and Preparation, Project Development Context, Assessing Project Viability, Financing and Approval, Sustainability and Lessons Learned

 

PMP 309: Project Sourcing, Negotiating and Contracting (3 credits)

In today’s increasingly competitive and globalized world, firms are trying to find ways to improve their performance and differentiate themselves from their rivals. Clearly, suppliers can have great impact on a firm’s total cost and help in this differentiation process. Increased levels of outsourcing and off shoring make correct selection of suppliers and their quality, along with development of relationships between suppliers and producers, more crucial than ever. Whatever the supplier provides, the effective organization needs a robust system to procure the correct goods and services at the best possible price for the organization. Once the organization has made the decision to procure goods and services from another organization, both organizations must clearly define the parameters of the relationship. The course cover the explaination the sourcing process in relation to procurement, Compare the main approaches to the sourcing of requirements from suppliers, Develop selection and award criteria that can be commonly applied when sourcing requirements from external suppliers, Explain the main consequences on supply chains when sourcing requirements from suppliers, Be able to develop a plan for sourcing goods or services from external suppliers, Choose appropriate selection criteria to inform the identification of appropriate external suppliers in the sourcing plan, Choose a balance of commercial and technical award criteria in the sourcing. Produce a plan for the sourcing of goods or services from external suppliers, Identify the main sources of information on potential suppliers’ financial performance, Calculate measures of liquidity, profitability, gearing, investment from relevant financial data on potential suppliers, Evaluate the financial performance of potential suppliers using relevant financial data, Assess commonly used sources of information on market data that can impact on the sourcing of requirements from external suppliers, Explain the main processes used for obtaining quotations and tenders, Explain the documentation that can comprise a commercial agreement for the supply of goods or services, Assess the legal issues that relate to the creation of commercial agreements with customers or suppliers, Explain the main types of contractual agreements made between customers and suppliers, Analyse the application of commercial negotiations in the work of procurement and supply, Compare the types of approaches that can be pursued in commercial negotiations, Explain how the balance of power in commercial negotiations can affect outcomes, Analyse the different types of relationships that impact on commercial negotiations, Evaluate costs and prices in commercial negotiations, Explain the economic factors that impact on commercial negotiations, Explain the main variables that can be used in a commercial negotiation, Analyse the resources required for a negotiation, Explain the stages of a commercial negotiation, Evaluate the main methods that can influence the achievement of desired outcomes, Evaluate the main communication skills that help achieve desired outcomes, Explain how to analyse the process and outcomes of the negotiations to inform future practice

 

PMP 302: Project Portfolio Management (3 credits)

This course specifically addresses how organizations achieve strategic goals and objectives through Project Portfolio and Programs of multiple Projects and how participants can gain competence in managing these. Specifically, this unit will address how an organisation strategically applies systematic problem solving techniques, and selects, initiates, prioritises, executes and controls initiatives through Portfolio Alignment, Monitoring and Control. The course will also consider how an organisation can benefit from delivering multiple projects in a Program environment including governing, controlling and supporting the organisation’s strategy through Program Management. The course objective is to build competence in managing portfolios and programs. The course will covers Organisational context, problem definition, problem solving skills, the portfolio prioritization process, select an organisation and a challenge, program context, program management processes, explain the 11 program management processes, select an organisation program, Methodology, Contract: their influences on the  project, Industry Trade-off Preference, Conclusion, Organizational Consideration, Product verse Project Management, Social Changes, The Market, Develop a project requirement document, and evaluate potential projects using financial and non-financial criteria. Develop a concept document for a project, and analyse the three major elements of a project: scope, time, and budget. Demonstrate your ability to estimate the cost and time variable of a project, and prepare simple Gantt, Critical Path Method, and PERT charts, and prepare a budget. Predicting Project success, project management effectiveness, the in-house representation, selling executive on project management, develop a project proposal, analyse and manage the phases of team development, plan and implement a project launch meeting, assemble the documents you need to control your project, evaluate the project launch meeting, and propose improvements for your next meeting, appraise your own leadership behaviours and skills and formulate a plan for personal growth.

PMP 304: Project Integration Management (3 credits)

This foundation course is a practical, industry standard, hands-on, case study based approach to managing projects that focuses on basic project management concepts and essential techniques. This high impact project management course provides an overview of key project concepts and terminology, and helps individuals effectively initiate, plan, execute, monitor & control, and close a project. It helps develop and improve project management skills for managing current and future projects, and is an ideal course for providing immediate implementation of project management knowledge and skills in your work place. Topics includes Project Management Overview: Project Management in the Project-Based Organization, Organizational Influences, Project Stakeholders and Governance, Project Life Cycles, Project Management Process Framework. Initiating Process Group: Overview of the Initiating Process Group, Project Integration Management, and Project Stakeholder Management. Planning Process: Overview of the Planning Process Group, Project Integration Management, Project Scope Management, Project Time Management, Project Cost Management, Project Quality Management, Project Stakeholder Management, Plan Communications Management, Project Risk Management. Executing Process Group: Overview of the Executing Process Group, Project Integration Management. Monitoring and Controlling Process Group: Overview of the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group, Project Integration Management. Closing Process Group: Overview of the Closing Process Group, Project Integration Management. Assessing Project Management Skills, Project Manager Skills

 

PMP 306: Application of Project Management & Software (3 credits)

The course imparts practical knowledge of the skills and techniques used to manage information systems projects. The success of many organisations depends on their ability to harness the power of information technology, but many information systems implemented by organisations either fail completely or do not live up to their potential. Organisations are recognising that it is many of the “behind the scenes” activities that result in a successful information system and are investing in project managers and their education. Project managers need many skills above and beyond the technical skills required to implement information systems. Management of time, scope and cost are vital, as are the “soft” skills of managing the team and communicating with the stakeholders. Topics to be treated includes; Microsoft Project Application, Statistical Package of Social scientist (SPSS) the strategic role of information systems, information systems and organizations, information, management, and decision making, the challenge of information systems, managing data resources, managing international information systems and ethical and social impact of information systems, Software features offered, Software Classification, Project Software evaluation, Implementation, MIS Requirement.

 

PMP 308: Project Management Leadership (3 credits)

An organization is more than a formal arrangement of functions, more than an organization chart, more than a vision statement, more than a set of accounts. An organization consists of people and so it is also a social system. In this course we will be looking at and seeking to explain human behavior within organizations.  This Course will evaluate critical aspects of project management leadership, project governance & ethics, project organizational structure, leadership behaviors, leadership theories & style, power to influence, resistance to change, emotional intelligence, leadership Vs. Management, working with stakeholders, project team, team Vs. group, team roles, team development phase, team building techniques, coaching & mentoring, negotiations, motivations,  delegation, communication, conflict resolution, problem solving, decision making.

 

PMP 310: Project Quality Management (3 credits)

This course is designed to emphasize the strategic importance of operations management to the overall performance of the enterprise. A functional view of how to manage the activities involved in the process of converting or transforming resources into products or services. Thus, the course examines the concepts for designing, planning, and improving manufacturing and service organizations. Students will also be taught a number of operational management techniques that could be applied to real world problems. Topic includes the staffing environment, Selecting the project Managers, Skills requirement for Project Managers, Management functions: Directing, Controlling, Project authority, Interpersonal influence, Barriers to project team development, Leadership in project environment, Life cycle leadership, Management pitfalls, Project Management Bottlenecks, Management policies and procedures. Product and process planning and design, forecasting, facility location and layout, production staffing, job design and work measurement, capacity planning, aggregate planning, inventory management, requirements planning, operations scheduling, Just-in-time, and quality assurance.

 

PMP 401: Project Management Maturity Model (3 credits)

This course focus on the application of economic models and rationale choice to business decision making. Managerial Economics is the application of economic theory and methodology to managerial decision making problems within various organizational settings such as a firm or a government agency.  The emphasis in this course will be on demand analysis and estimation, production and cost analysis under different market conditions, forecasting and decision making under uncertainty. Students taking this course are expected to have had some exposure to economics and be comfortable with basic algebra. Some knowledge of calculus would also be helpful although not necessary. The course cove the fundamentals of managerial economics, Demand and Supply, Regression Analysis: Demand Estimation, Costs of Production and the Organization of the Firm, Market Structures: Pricing and Output Decisions, Game Theory and Pricing Strategies, The Economics of Information and the Role of Government in the Marketplace, Regulating the Market Economy, and Project Decisions

 

PMP 403: Project Management Consultancy Theory (3 credits)

This course explore the concepts and practical techniques to apply consulting methods in their work and to participate in or manage complex projects.  The topics include the five stages of the consulting process which include entry and contracting, discovery and dialogue, analysis and the decision to act, engagement and implementation and closing; analysis and presentation techniques; and examination of the five major project process groups which include project initiation, planning, execution, controlling and closing.

 

PMP 405: Managerial Economics for Decision Making (3 credits)

This course focus on the application of economic models and rationale choice to business decision making. Managerial Economics is the application of economic theory and methodology to managerial decision making problems within various organizational settings such as a firm or a government agency. The emphasis in this course will be on demand analysis and estimation, production and cost analysis under different market conditions, forecasting and decision making under uncertainty. Students taking this course are expected to have had some exposure to economics and be comfortable with basic algebra. Some knowledge of calculus would also be helpful although not necessary. The course cove the fundamentals of managerial economics, Demand and Supply, Regression Analysis: Demand Estimation, Costs of Production and the Organization of the Firm, Market Structures: Pricing and Output Decisions, Game Theory and Pricing Strategies, The Economics of Information and the Role of  Government in the Marketplace, Regulating the Market Economy, and Project Decisions.

PMP 407: Project Manpower Management (3 credits)

This course is concerned with the construction industry’s approach to project manpower management. The project manpower management area is viewed at two levels: the personal face-to-face management of small work groups such as construction crews; and the impersonal management of groups of people such as the field work force, design groups, and project teams. The course specifically focuses on the management processes associated with the planning, scheduling, enumerating, and performance monitoring of the personal and impersonal aspects of project manpower. The course will cover the following topics: project manpower new approach to a management problem, functional approach to manpower management, the elements of a decision process, the portrayal of management roles, project team concepts, the project team structure: the components, the project team structure: the traveling project manager, the project team structure: field based project management, the project team structure: total field autonomy, policies: the portrayal of management attitude, management attitudes: policies of the small firm, management attitudes: policies of the medium-sized firm, management attitudes: policies of the large firm, management attitudes: policies of the autonomous project team, manpower management decision processes, project manpower management: an overview,

 

PMP 402: Reconstructing Project Management (3 credits)

Reconstructing Project Management is designed for the purist, the academic, the project practitioner and the project organisation in equal measure. The course again cover ‘Deconstructing Project Management’, its covers exceedingly well the complexity of the subject, simplifying and integrating the various conceptual elements relevant to the broad discipline of managing projects. ‘Reconstructing Project Management’, unravelling the challenges in the 21st century as well as the opportunities opening up for us. The art and science of project management is enunciated here in a way that can be grasped by all those wishing to manage change in our society. Historical method, bespeaking relevant knowledge, project management before it was invented, systems project management, the project management knowledge base developing project management, enterprise-wide project management (EWPM), the development of project management, deconstructing deconstruction – control, scope management, scheduling, estimating,  budgeting,  cost management, performance management (earned value), organisation – roles and responsibilities, structure, structural forms, contingency theory and organisation design, project management contingency, governance and strategy, managing the emerging project definition procurement and the project’s commercial   management, adding value, controlling risk, delivering quality,   safely and securely building value, achieving benefits, People – Leadership, Teams, Stakeholder Management, Culture, Individuals’ Skills and Behaviours, The Institutional Context – PMOs, Functions of the PMO, Clearing the Decks for Reconstruction

 

PMP 404: Project Estimation & Cost Management (3 credits)

Project Estimating and Cost Management covers the fundamentals of estimating projects in a discipline-independent context. It covers the essentials of project estimating, progress monitoring, and cost management, and is intended for project professionals who need a quick overview of the process of estimating the cost of projects. Special attention is focused on estimate accuracy and the issues surrounding cost and schedule overruns.

 

PMP 406: Project Change Management (3 credits)

The course is designed to meet an organization’s need to understand the most useful approaches now available to bring about improvements in organizational performance as measured by: Return on investment, Value-added per employee, and Customer satisfaction. Each topic in this course is designed to reach employees at all levels of an organization. The goal of the course is to present complex methodologies in a way that is simple but not simplistic. The following are other subjects covered in the books in this series: Statistical process controls b Process redesign, Process reengineering, Establishing a balanced scorecard, Reliability analysis, Fostering teamwork, Environmental Management Systems ISO-14000, Simulation modeling, Rewards and recognition, Performance improvement methods b Creativity tools b Statistical analysis simplified, Area activity analysis

 

PMP 408: Program Management Leadership (3 credits)

This course empowers participants to become effective leaders and managers in the international development context. International development work involves multi-stakeholder cooperation and delivery in challenging environments. We designed this course to target governments from developing countries as well as practitioners in the international development community. The course tailors leadership and management training as it pertains to the public service sector and public sector reform. The course will cover Leading Teams and Organizations: Developing personal leadership competencies: self-awareness; courage; vision; strategic and analytical thinking; learning agility; decisiveness; energy; results driven; credibility; influence; communication, Planning for and achieving team and organizational results, Building and maintaining relationships, Recognizing human potential and delegating appropriately, Building diversity, Fostering innovation, Handling risks, changes, complications and conflicts, Coaching and appraisal, Commitment to continuous improvement, Cultural adaptation. General team and organizational management skills: change management; communication management; conflict management; constraint management; crisis management; decision management; financial management; human resource management; information management; operations management; perception management; performance management; process management; project and program management; quality management; resource management; risk management; skills management; strategic management. Leadership and Management in the International Development Work: Meeting donor and other key stakeholder requirements, Building strong relationships with strategic partners, Executing in challenging political environments, Working with limited resources, Institutionalizing open and participatory communication channels, & Negotiations

 

PMP 410: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce participants to the planning process, procurement of works or services, client’s objective, method and responsibility, the contract plan, procurement routes, advantages and disadvantages of different methods of contracting, decision criteria, conventional methods, private finance initiative schemes (PFIS), legal issues arising from the contract plan, persons against whom the employer has a right of action; and who owe the employer a duty of care, the measure of damages, nature and extent of the employer’s liabilities, pre-contractual discussions, competitive tendering, open competitive tendering, single tender negotiation, methods of price negotiation, discussion of costs and prices, head office charges, terms of payment, equality of information, proprietary equipment, planning the tender, study of the inquiry documents, planning the tender, tender price level, joint ventures and consortia, approval by the purchaser to the joint venture bid, joint venture characteristics 56 special considerations applying to local partners, tender preparation, tender documents, tender appraisal, organization of tender appraisal, award criteria, methodology, placing the contract, contract work, purchaser’s obligations, contract price, program time for completion, performance guarantees 83 conditions of contract, appointment of engineer or architect, standard terms of contract, standard terms of contract, defects, variations in price and time, claims and their negotiation 193 types of claim, claims presentation and management, dispute resolution, particular forms of contract, contracts for computer systems, facilities management contracts

 

PMP 411: Technology in Reverse Logistics Operations (3 credits)

This course studies the use of GPS, RFID and bar coding technology used to track and trace products through the forward supply chain and the reverse logistics process. This course will provide the learner required knowledge in technology. This knowledge will range from basic information systems to planning of networks, architectures, and databases. The learner will then move into ethics, security, and project management. Finally, the learner will wrap up the course with a firm grasp of supply chain and globalization in the technology realm of logistics. Instruction is primarily textbook driven with case studies, essays, forum topics and a research paper. Logistics Management is the part of supply chain management that plans, implements, and controls the efficient, effective forward and reverse flow and storage of goods, services, and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption in order to meet customers’ requirements.1 This course provides a practical, management perspective of the following areas of logistics: distribution, transportation, international logistics, inventory control, sustainable logistics practices, key performance indicators, supply chain finance, leadership in a supply chain role, and an introduction to logistics technology including RFID and ERP systems. The course is designed for students who have had little or no previous coursework or professional experience in logistics. Overview of Logistics, Supply Chain Management, Distribution Management, Inventory Management, Transportation Management, International Logistics, Sustainable Supply Chains, Applied Logistics Data Analysis, Supply Chain Finance, Logistics IT, RFID, ERP Simulation, and Outsourcing Logistics, Integrating Logistics Management Concepts. Information Systems in Business, Strategic Decision Making & E-business, Ethics and Information Security, Enterprise Architectures & Databases and Data Warehouses, Networks, Telecommunications, and Mobile Technology, Operations Management and Supply Chain Management & Customer Relationship Management and Business Intelligence, Enterprise Resource Planning and Collaboration Systems, Systems Development and Project Management & Globalization, Innovation, and 21st Century Organizational Trends Learning Outcomes

 

PMP 415: Inventory & Materials Management (3 credits)

The student will learn the theories and importance of inventory t and materials management in project settings. Students will identify the steps in receiving, verifying and reconciling project orders, stock rotation, restocking and monitoring expiry dates of project materials and over the counter medications. Return policies and recalls, and the documentation required with these activities. Students will learn how to participate in pharmaceutical waste disposal management. To identify the elements and organizations involved in material management. Materials management elements and functions, Organizational implications, Current and future product plans, Commodity management, Supplier selection and supply base management, Current product planning: Sales, inventory, and manufacturing plan, Materials plan: MRPII, Quality impact, Just-in-time (JIT) and distributions requirement planning (DRP), Supplier certification, Transportation, Managing inventory flow, utilizing good business, principles and practices, Inventory and the Supply Chain, Inventory Key Concepts, Inventory Replenishment Methods and Systems, Stock Control and Inventory Performance, Evaluating Inventory Performance, Inventory Strategies, Inventory Improvements

 

PMP 417: Global Engineering and Construction (3 credits)

Decision makers rely on sound analysis to make timely strategic actions. However, when the information is incomplete, inaccurate or measures the wrong indicators, the decision making process can bring to wrong choices and loss of time and resources. Identify your project needs correctly and recognize areas that need to be improved before they become major issues. This course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the development and position of performance analysis in sport. Practical skills using modern performance analysis techniques will be developed. Students will be required to track and analyse the performance of two athletes within a team sport through the duration of the course. This course introduces basic techniques and develops skills in performance analysis. Accessible technology for tactical and skill analysis is used in a sporting context familiar to the student. Students learn basic statistical techniques and how to use Excel and SPSS to analyse data. The course cover theory and historical development of Performance Analysis, use of video to support Performance Analysis, qualitative and quantitative analysis (using SPSS and Excel for statistical analysis), Strategic objectives, Causal logic, Metrics, Governance, Reporting, Individual performance, and Actions to drive performance

 

PMP 414: Country Procurement System (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce participants to the strategies, approaches and tools for developing effective country procurement systems. It is increasingly recognized that using a country’s own institutions and systems, including procurement, strengthens the country’s sustainable capacity to define, execute and account for its policies to its citizens. The course will cover: overview of Public Procurement Reform and Country Procurement Systems, Legislative and Regulatory Framework, Institutional, Operational and Organizational Resources, Professional Procurement Workforce, Introducing new Procurement Policies and Practices

 

PMP 416: Distribution & Warehouse Management (3 credits)

This course provides an understanding of the concepts and theories that drive the effective management of an organization’s warehousing and distribution systems. This course will explain the role of warehousing and distribution management in supporting an organization’s supply chain management strategy. The course will cover topics that include Materials management elements and functions, Organizational implications, Current and future product plans, Commodity management, Supplier selection and supply base management, Current product planning: Sales, inventory, and manufacturing plan, Materials plan: MRPII, Quality impact, Just-in-time (JIT) and distributions requirement planning (DRP), Supplier certification, Transportation, Managing inventory flow, utilizing good business, principles and practices, Inventory and the Supply Chain, Inventory Key Concepts, Inventory Replenishment Methods and Systems, Stock Control and Inventory Performance, Evaluating Inventory Performance, Inventory Strategies, Inventory Improvements, Warehousing Layout, Design & Configuration, Receiving, Delivery, Material Storage, as well as Distribution strategies, Distribution Network planning, Distribution ERP systems (WMS) and Cross docking

PMP 418: International Public Procurement – IPP (3 credits)

The International Procurement program covers the institutional, legal, financial and procedural issues involved in the procurement of goods and services by public entities and discusses reform programs to improve transparency, efficiency and accountability. It provides participants with a detailed analysis of the project-procurement cycle including a full presentation of the procurement policies of international financial institutions (IFI) such as the World Bank, and comprehensive coverage of the open tender system. The course will cover Public Procurement Reforms: Reform programs and approaches to enhance transparency, efficiency, integrity and accountability. National Procurement Laws and Institutions: Differing approaches under common law and civil code systems, UNCITRAL model law, Transparency and accountability; ethics and corruption. International Procurement: Policies and procedures of international financial institutions such as the World Bank, ADB, IDB, etc. Procurement Planning: Role and objectives, Policy and institutional aspects, Project cycle: procurement issues, Procurement process under goods, works and PPP, Budgeting, budget utilization and monitoring. Selection of Consultants: Procedures of IFIs, Terms of reference, evaluation of proposals, Contracts: lump sum, time-based. International Competitive Bidding (ICB): Objectives, principles, and key features, The bid package: preparation and scheduling, Bid advertising and prequalification, Preparation of bidding documents, Bid examination, evaluation, and award. Other Methods of Procurement: Limited/restrictive international bidding, national competitive bidding, Direct purchase, shopping, Internet bidding, electronic procurement, Green Procurement, Versatile and adaptive procurement. Contract Administration: Principal types of contracts, terms, and guarantees, Negotiation techniques, Dispute avoidance and resolution, Oversight and monitoring, Performance-Based Contracting

 

PMP 421: Payroll Accounting & Management   (3 credits)

This course covers federal and state laws pertaining to wages, payroll taxes, payroll tax forms, and journal and general ledger transactions. Emphasis is on computing wages; calculating social security, income, and unemployment taxes; preparing appropriate payroll tax forms; and journalizing/posting transactions. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze data, make appropriate computations, complete forms, and prepare accounting entries using appropriate technology. The topics may include Laws governing payroll and personnel records, Fair Labor Standards Act, State minimum wage and maximum hours law, Fair employment laws, Human Resources System, Payroll accounting system, Payroll register,  Employee’s earnings record, Computing and paying wages and salaries, Application of the Fair Labor Standards Act, Provisions of coverage, Enterprise coverage, Individual employee coverage, Employee defined, Wages, Overtime hours and overtime pay, Social security taxes, Withholding for income taxes Coverage under federal income tax withholding law, Withholding allowances and withholding certificates, Withholding tax on supplemental wage payments, Advance payment of earned income credit, Tax-Deferred retirement accounts, Wage and tax, Unemployment compensation taxes Analyzing and journalizing payroll transactions, Payroll register, Employee’s earnings record, Recording gross payroll and withholdings, Methods of paying wages and salaries, Unclaimed wages, Recording payroll taxes, Recording the deposit or payment of payroll taxes H. Recording the adjustment for end of year wages, Computerized Payroll Project

 

PMP 425: International Accounting Standards (IFRS, IAS, IPSAS) (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the background of the IAS, IFRS, & IPSAS Board and its objectives, and addition to an overview of current accrual-based IAS, IFRS, & IPSAS. IAS, IFRS, & IPSAS are rapidly becoming the global accounting standards for all business sectors. The correct adoption of IAS, IFRS, & IPSAS S promises organisations many benefits, including enhanced investor confidence, greater consistency and transparency of financial reporting, as well as the ability to compare financial information from companies around the world. This course will ensure that students are fully aware of all the recent developments in international accounting, by offering complete information on how to successfully implement IAS, IFRS, & IPSAS in their organisation. Topics will includes introduction to IPSAS/IAS/IFRS, Brief history, Improvements Project (revised IPSAS and Preface), Scope of IPSAS, Sources of guidance, Accounting for Government Business Enterprises (definition and accounting requirements), IFAC and the IPSAS Board, Differences between IAS/IFRS and IPSAS, Adoption of IPSAS, Reporting and Disclosure, IPSAS Presentation of Financial Statements, Required financial statements, Structure, IPSAS 2 Cash Flow Statements, Cash and cash equivalents, Operating, INVESTING and financing activities, IPSAS 24 Presentation of Budget Information in Financial Statements, Required disclosures, Comparison of budget and actual amounts, Material differences. Cash-Basis Standard, Financial Reporting Under the Cash Basis of Accounting, General Considerations, Correction of Errors, Consolidated Financial Statements, Going Concern, Extraordinary Items. Introduction IFRS and IAS Principles, IFRS 1: First Time Adoption Of IFRS, Financial Statement Presentation (IAS 1, 7, 34; IFRS 2, 5), Measuring Financial Performance (IAS 8, 24, 33; IFRS 2, IFRS 13), Business Combinations (IFRS 3), Consolidations IFRS 10 (IAS 27), IFRS 11 (IAS 31), IFRS 12, IAS 28 and IAS 21, Leases (IAS 17) (Including Exposure Draft), Revenue Recognition (IAS 11, 18) (Including IFRS 15)

 

PMP 421: Commercial Risk and Insurance Management (3 credits)

This course focuses on the ways in which businesses and society assess, control, and transfer risk. This process, known as the risk management process, is becoming an increasingly important tool in the management of business and personal financial health. An effective and efficient corporate risk management program leads to knowledge and control of costs and an improved bottom line. The risk management process involves identification of risks and associated potential costs, analysis of the causes of risk of financial loss, determination of various strategies to treat risk, selection of strategies appropriate to the goals and objectives of the business, implementation of the selected strategies, management and monitoring of results. Making adjustments, adapting to external and internal forces, and crisis or disaster management are incorporation. The may include Introduction to Risk Management, The Private Insurance Industry, Legal Principles in Risk & Insurance, Personal Property and Liability Risks, Commercial Property and Liability Risks, Current Events Research, Insurance markets, Insurance companies, Insurance finance, Insurance law Commercial Insurance, Annuities, Retirement plans, Social insurance, Health & Group Insurance, Case debate

 

PMP 423: Fraud Examination & Forensics Account (3 credits)

Effective decision making involves analyzing the future consequences of today’s decisions.  Capital budgeting involves the selection of long-term assets of the firm.  The intuition is simple: we are trying to find projects that are worth more than they cost.  Related to this, projects have different levels of risk and we need to understand these risks to make sound business decisions. This section of the course illustrates techniques for estimating the cash flows from a project and determining if the project is beneficial for the business. Topics may include Spot and stop skimming, billing and payroll schemes; check tampering; expense reimbursement and register disbursement schemes; corruption; and more. Understand financial statements and identify fraud. Plan an investigation, collect evidence, interview witnesses, organize and analyze documentary evidence and write a report. Understand the red flags. Introduction: difference between occupational fraud and abuse. Categories of fraud: asset misappropriation, corruption and fraudulent financial statements. The methodology of fraud examination. Skimming, Cash larceny. Billing schemes: personal purchases with company funds. Check tampering. Payroll schemes, expense reimbursement schemes and register disbursement schemes. Noncash assets misappropriation schemes, concealing of inventory shrinkage. Accounting principles and fraud. International regulations on fraud, corruption and terrorism. Corruption and Conflicts of Interest. Fraud in Financial Statements: responsibility of the entity and reporting to users.

 

PMP 425: Financial Derivatives & Securities (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the world of derivative and securities, and in particular explores the interaction between an elegant mathematical theory and real-world application. Although the theory may appear fairly mathematical and abstract, it has proved to be one of the success stories of modern economics, providing surprisingly accurate predictions. This course examines the function and operation derivative markets serve in finance. To begin, the course identifies relationships that must hold in such markets if there are to be no arbitrage opportunities. The course then covers options pricing using the Binomial and Black-Scholes approach, as well as describing a wide range of futures and options dealing strategies, along with their applications to hedging and risk management. Currency and fixed-interest derivatives are also considered as well as swaps, options on futures and some alternative exotic options. The topics may include an Introduction to Financial Market, Options Markets, Basic Options Valuation, The Binomial Option Pricing Model, Interest Rate Time, Volatility Time, Exponential/Natural Log Functions, Judgmental, Historical, Regulatory Volatility, Market Benchmarked Expectations, Volatility, Price Value at Risk, Implied Volatility & Its Term Structure, Option fundamentals: calls, puts, and underlying, Option Positions and Strategies. The Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model, Options Strategies and Risk Management for Individuals, An Introduction to Futures Markets, Principles of Forward and Futures Pricing, Hedging with Futures, Options on Futures, Currency Derivatives and Exotic Options, Portfolio Theory, Equity and Equity Markets, Money Markets, Debt Markets, Debt Market Instruments, Futures Markets,  Market Innovations

 

PMP 427: Financial Reporting & Market Analysis (3 credits)

This course is structured to enable students to complete financial accounting tasks with reference to the professional, legislative, and theoretical framework of accounting and depth understanding of market research. Completion of the course should enable students to demonstrate knowledge of the ‘regulatory’ environment within which accounting procedures and reporting practices operate. Financial Accounting is a key course for students who wish to pursue a career in professional accounting. Topics covered include the accounting conceptual framework; accounting for non-current assets and intangibles; cash flow statements; financial statement analysis; and accounting for leases. The topics may include an overview of the external reporting environment, the conceptual framework of accounting and its relevance to financial reporting, fair value measurement, depreciation of property, plant and equipment, revaluations and impairment testing of non-current assets, accounting for intangibles, accounting for liabilities, accounting for leases, legal requirements & accounting policies on disclosure, financial statements disclosure presentation & cash-flow statements, the Role of Market Research and the Research Process, Nature of Survey Research, and Interpretation and Report Writing

 

PMP 431: Micro & Macro Economics (3 credits)

The course provides an introduction to a core area of economics known as microeconomics. It considers the operation of a market economy and the problem of how best to allocate society’s scarce resources. The course considers the way in which various decision making units in the economy (individuals and firms) make their consumption and production decisions and how these decisions are coordinated. It considers the laws of supply and demand, and introduces the theory of the firm, and its components, production and cost theories and models of market structure. The various causes of market failure are assessed, and consideration is given to public policies designed to correct this market failure. The course will cover Fundamental Principles of Microeconomics, Principles of Supply and Demand, Principles of Markets and Welfare, Principles of Government Intervention, Principles of Firm Behaviour, Principles of Market Organization, Principles of Income Distribution, measuring gross domestic product, inflation, and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, long-term growth; money, banking and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power and interest rate parity. Financial Management introduction, Financial Ratio Analysis, Financial Forecasting Improve the Planning and Performance, Working Capital, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Required Rate of Return on an Investment, Evaluate Investment Choices, Applications in Capital Budgeting

 

PMP 433: Mathematics for Economists (3 credits)

This class is designed to provide the appropriate tools for study in the policy concentration. Examples and motivation are drawn from important topics in economics. Topics covered include derivatives of functions of one and several variables; interpretations of the derivatives; convexity; constrained and unconstrained optimization; series, including geometric and Taylor series; ordinary differential equations; matrix algebra; eigenvalues; and (possibly) dynamic optimization and multivariable integration. Topics includes Linear (affine) n-dimensional space, Subspaces of a vector space, A span of a system of vectors, Euclidean spaces, Linear transformations, Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix, Applications of diagonalization of a matrix, Lyapounov’s stability, Number sets and convergence of number sequences, Continuous and differentiable functions of one variable, Basic concepts of set theory, Functions of several variables, Optimization of functions of several variables, A constrained optimization, Economic sense of Lagrange multipliers, A maximization of function of several variables with inequality constraints, Economic applications of nonlinear programming, Homogeneous functions, Convex and concave functions, Linear programming, A dual problem for linear program & Games

 

PMP 432: Econometric   (3 credits)

This course is to extend students’ knowledge and equip them with methods and techniques that allow them to analyse finance-related issues. This course starts by illustrating how to measure financial returns, the main variable that we try to model in financial applications. There are various definitions of returns, and introduction will illustrates how to compute the various types of returns. After defining financial returns, presents some stylised facts about the properties of financial returns. These include volatility clustering, asymmetric volatility and non-normality. Unit 1 then introduces various measures of moments of the distribution of financial returns, and how these can be computed for samples of financial returns. The material covered in this unit sets the scene for the rest of the course and thus it is important that you make yourself familiar with these concepts.  The course will cover Statistical Properties of Financial Returns, Matrix Algebra, Regression and Applications in Finance, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, Univariate Time Series and Applications to Finance, Modelling Volatility – Conditional Heteroscedastic Models, Modelling Volatility and Correlations – Multivariate GARCH Models, Vector Autoregressive Models, and Limited Dependent Variable Models, The paradigm of econometrics, the classical linear regression model. Specification and computation, the classical linear regression model. statistical inference in finite samples, asymptotic theory,  instrumental variables, the generalized regression model, techniques for analyzing panel data, nonlinear regression models, methods of estimation, non- and semiparametric, time series modeling

 

PMP 434: Applied Industrial Economics (3 credits)

In this module, the aim is to provide students with an understanding of theoretical models of firm behaviour and of empirical approaches to testing such models.  The first part concentrates on game theoretic models used in industrial economics.  We will introduce key concepts in game theory and then apply them to some specific industrial economics models.  The second part of the module concentrates on empirical analysis in energy economics and the third part look at economics of heath.  We will look at studies of structure and firm/industry performance and the New Empirical Industrial Organisation (NEIO), dealing with relevant measurement and econometric issues as we go along. The course will cover Approaches to industrial economics, A game theory ‘toolkit’, Quantity and Price Setting Models, Product Differentiation Models, Empirical Analysis I: theoretical basis, Empirical Analysis II: SCP, Empirical Analysis III: NEIO, Summing up: the role of theory and evidence. Introduction to political economy, public goods and the collective action problem, elections and public policy. majority rule, the political economy of inequality and redistribution, political agency, organisation of legislatures and legislative procedures, interest groups, political leadership, the origins and effects of political institutions, information, mass media and public policy, electoral rules and policy outcomes. Overview of Energy Supply and Demand, Introduction, energy basics, Ghana and world energy consumption and trade, Overview of energy demand, energy end uses, history of energy use, energy intensity of GDP, Fossil Fuel Markets, Coal, Oil, Hamilton, Understanding Crude Oil Prices, Natural Gas. Externalities and Public Policy, Pollution, Climate change, From Primary Production to End Use, Energy transportation and storage, Electricity and regulation, The Future of Nuclear Power, Deregulation and competition, Financing Energy Development, Energy resources and economic rent, The Leasing of Federal Lands for Fossil Fuel Production: Political Economy of Oil in Ghana, economic rent, leasing and taxation of energy resources, government revenues, Allocation of resources over time and financing energy development, discounting, “levelized” costs of renewable resources, depletion of non-renewable resources, Electricity supply, energy sources, cost of production, Energy futures, IEA World Energy Outlook, Executive Summary, Presentation of case study; written case study report due. Introduction to Health Economics, Health Care Systems, Determinants of Health class, Health Care as a Commodity, Health Care Insurance, Demand for Health & Health Care, Supply of Health Care, Economic Evaluation. The course will also delve into the economic theories or models necessary to evaluate the efficiency of the market for, and the efficient allocation of scarce resources in, health and health care. Examples of possible topics to be covered are the nature of the market, supply and demand of health care services, asymmetries of information, externalities, principal-agent relationships, insurance, and economic evaluation.

 

PMP 436: International Economics (3 credits)

The main goal of the course is to introduce students to introductory level of theories of international finance flows, determination of interest and exchange rates in interconnected economies, macroeconomic policies available to the government, and the nature of financial crises. Focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course (Topics in the Global Economy). The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination; and government intervention in foreign exchange markets. The topics includes Important issues in international trade, History and present state of world trade flows, Ghanaian trade balance, History of the development of trade theory, Essentials: Ricardo and Comparative Advantage, Factor Price Equalization and Trade, Who Wins and Who Loses from Trade?, Standard Trade Models and Country Welfare, An Empirical Evaluation of Trade Patterns, Market Imperfections and Trade, International Factor Movements, Tariffs and Non-Tariff Barriers to Trade, Government Intervention in Trade, Strategic Trade Policies, Development through Trade Policies, Political Economy of Trade (optional, time permitting), World Trade Organization, Preferential Trading Arrangements, Custom Unions and Economic Integration, Distinction between International Trade and International Macroeconomics, National Income accounting and the Balance of Payments, Asset Approach to Exchange Rate Determination, Money, Interest Rates, and Exchange Rates, Price Levels and the Exchange Rate in the Long Run, Output and the Exchange Rate in the Short Run, Fixed exchange rate regime, The international monetary system, International capital markets and emerging markets, Financial and economic crisis of 2008-2016

 

PMP 438: Economic Integration & Sustainable Development   (3 credits)

This course seeks to provide students with a relatively strong foundation in integration theory measurement and policy. The course will discuss the critical theoretical concepts in integration developed by Balassa, Viner, Meade, Bhagwati, Panagariya, Cooper-Masell, Johnson and Demas. The course will review as far as possible integration experiences in the Single European Market, the North American Free Trade Area (NAFTA), the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the Central American Common Market (CACM) and African Common Stock Market. For a variety of reasons it often makes sense for nations to coordinate their economic policies. Coordination can generate benefits that are not possible otherwise. A clear example of this is shown in the discussion of trade wars among large countries. There it is shown that if countries cooperate and set zero tariffs against each other, then both countries are likely to benefit relative to the case when both countries attempt to secure short-term advantages by setting optimal tariffs. This is just one advantage of cooperation. Benefits may also accrue to countries who liberalize labor and capital movements across borders, who coordinate fiscal policies and resource allocation towards agriculture and other sectors and who coordinate their monetary policies. Any type of arrangement in which countries agree to coordinate their trade, fiscal, and/or monetary policies is referred to as economic integration. Obviously, there are many different degrees of integration. The course will cover Origins and evolution of technology:  Introduction, What is technology? Origins of technologies, Co-evolution of technology and economy. Disruptive Manufacturing, Technologies: The Case of 3D Printing, Coffee and Tractors [Topic memo due], Margarine and Recorded Music, Electricity and refrigeration, Technology and institutions, Technological lockin. International diffusion of agricultural biotechnology. Resistance to green technologies: Pest-resistant transgenic crops, Transgenic fish [Extended outline due], Wind energy, transgenic trees. Disruption Policy and institutional implications: Precautionary principle, Biosafety, public controversy and the media, from market niches to techno-economic paradigms, Science and technology advice, Science and technology diplomacy. Human Capital Investment; Estimating the Rate of Return to Schooling; Education Quality and Peer Effects, Wages and Changes in the Structure of Wages, Wages and Firm Specific Capital; Wages and Trade Unions; Changes in Wage Inequality. Labour Supply, Static Labour Supply; Intertemporal/Life-Cycle Labour Supply; Household and Family Models. Labour Demand, Models of Labour Demand; Minimum Wages. Labour Market Discrimination, Intergenerational Mobility, Crime and the Labour Market Macroeconomic overview of the international, regional and global economy in the context of the economic slowdown. Theoretical fundamentals of economic integration, including the Cooper Massel condition. Economic Integration through Sports: Olympics, Athletics and building social cohesion in CARICOM. Central American Economic Integration: Case SICA. Economic Integration and the informal sector: The role of Informal commercial importers: Case Caribbean Higglers. Growth, structural change and vulnerability, in CARICOM countries, CARIFORUM-EU economic partnership agreement: the welfare impact and implications for policy in T&T. CARICOM: some salient factors affecting trade and competitiveness. Trade policy, integration and growth in the Caribbean. CSME and the intra-regional migration of nurses: some proposed opportunities

Finishing Activities

PMP 409: Business Practicum (3 credits)
Participants investigate core aspects of business and industry within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and real world situations. Students may pursue practicum through a supervised practice, apprenticeship, professional employment position, advanced field study or other external exploration under the direction of a qualified

Faculty advisor and an approved field site sponsor. Students participate in the practicum for a minimum of 50 contact hours. The field placement is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands on experience and in-depth knowledge of a specific area of business. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for the practicum.

PMP 480: Senior Project (3 credits)
The Senior Project is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student’s overall academic competencies relative to the field of study. The process includes a brief proposal stage discussion with the student’s primary faculty advisor, a manuscript preparation stage, and a project review stage. Students are provided an opportunity to investigate an area of special interest in their concentration within project management, which has potential for advancing their profession development. The Senior Project is presented in a formal manuscript approximating 20 to 25 double-spaced typewritten pages with proper referencing and citations of the scholarly literature. The student’s project should convey a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter. While most projects may take the form of a standard research project, with the mentor’s approval, students may pursue another appropriate format such as an audio- or videotape project, a recorded public performance, a business plan, original work of art, detailed case study or another relevant style of project presentation, a approved by the primary faculty advisor.

PMP 499: Final Examination (3 credits)

Once the coursework assessment is satisfactorily completed, the faculty advisor schedules the Final Examination. The administration and an assigned faculty specialist representing the student’s primary academic area conduct the final examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Student answers are expected to draw from the academic competencies of their program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. An oral component of the examination is normally a follow-up to the written section, completed by face-to-face conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of the written responses.

CREDIT VIA PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT

Assessment of Prior Education and Training Documentation

College coursework and college level equivalency training completed at recognized education and training institutions are accepted credit-for-credit, provided the coursework satisfies meaningful elements of your program of studies. As a participant in the alternative undergraduate program, students may have an unlimited number of transfer credits applied toward their degree. Student’s should carefully review the University’s guidelines regarding transfer credits and explore these details with their primary mentor. The University will accept all credits, point-for-point from recognized educational institutions, including training institutions (such as those organizations approved by the American Council of Education and other reputable groups across the global community). Formal transcripts or notarized affidavits must be provided for all awards of transfer credits. All transfer courses are translated to the semester credit system followed by the University.

 

Review of Professional Portfolios

As a participant in the alternative undergraduate program, students may have an unlimited number of equivalency credits applied toward their degree through assessment of professional portfolios.

The professional portfolio should be developed relative to creditworthy elements of the student’s career background for which sufficient credible evidence exists to correlate effectively with college-level learning objectives. The source of prior learning might be advanced employment experience, non-college training, continuing education, seminars and conferences, professional achievements, employment training, language training, technical classes, training leading to special certificates, diplomas and licenses or other advanced level learning obtained from personal and professional achievements.

Duplicative credit may not be awarded. Students are advised to carefully review the University’s guidelines covering prior learning assessment and discuss these matters in detail with the primary mentor starting immediately after program registration.

Prior Learning Policy

The University respects the college-level prior learning of its adult students to the extent that such learning is appropriate to the degrees pursued by our students and satisfies the expectations of the University’s faculty. The University allows prior learning to be credited toward the Bachelor’s degree from transfer courses (by transcript review) and from appropriate career experience and non-college training (by professional portfolio evaluation). Mid-career adults have creditworthy elements in their backgrounds for which sufficient credible evidence exists of advanced level learning. The source of prior learning might include work experience, non-college training, continuing education, seminars and conferences, career experiences and personal achievements, employment training, language training, technical classes, training leading to special certificates, diplomas and licenses and other advanced level learning obtained from personal and professional achievements. Under the direction of the University’s primary mentors, and within certain clearly defined guidelines, students may submit and array of professional portfolios for assessment of college equivalency credit in fulfillment of the requirements for the alternative Bachelor’s degree.

The Portfolio Document

The portfolio document must be presented in a manner that allows a detailed formal evaluation to be made of the prior learning. Students are required to attach copies of the necessary documentation, affidavits and certificates that permit an effective comparison of the prior learning experiences to the course objectives. While the portfolio document must include this authentic documentation, an equally important element is the student’s narrative that summarizes and discusses the knowledge, skills and competencies acquired in the professional setting, or through non-college training. Portfolios are allowed in all academic fields and are usually designed to permit the student to demonstrate higher levels of cognition where they have used the subject matter to address real world situations in a creative manner. Permission to submit a portfolio for assessment should be requested by the student at the time the Study Plan is established. Prior learning assessment courses deemed complete will have the specified semester credits awarded on the student’s permanent record. If a student is unsuccessful at passing the portfolio assessment, the mentor may decide to assign additional text and journal readings and other necessary exploratory activities in order to prepare the student for an additional course assessment (at additional cost to the student). After successfully completing these additional assignments and assessments, course credit will be granted. A standardize attachment to the Study Plan is used to communicate the content of the prior learning assessment to be undertaken.

Portfolio Evaluation

Professional portfolio evaluation is a detailed assessment of a student’s prior learning in a limited and defined area, including the gathering together of authentic documents to validate and demonstrate advanced level learning. The task of the University faculty is to guide the student in structuring a formal written presentation in support of documentation from professional achievements and non-college training. To be awarded credit, all prior learning must clearly fulfill the academic objectives of the course and reflect the appropriate level of complexity in academic learning. The primary faculty advisor shall independently evaluate each course approved for portfolio assessment. Upon completion of each course pursued by prior learning assessment, at the time of submission of the course grade, the portfolio document is transferred by post to the University headquarters for storage in the University archival library.